AA Learn more about in-home care options for your loved ones

Given the choice, most of us want to stay in our homes. Sometimes, people need help to remain at home. That's where Always Best Care Senior Services comes in.

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TESTIMONIALS

“Best place I’ve ever worked. Not only do they take care of their clients, their employees too!! Blessed everyday to work for this company”

Jeanine L.
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TESTIMONIALS

“I’d like to thank always best care for all their support. As this was my first experience with any senior care agency, I was a bit apprehensive but they were great right from the start. All the caregivers were very attentive and assisted my parents with proper care at home. Undoubtedly a great caregiving agency..”

Christoper W.
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TESTIMONIALS

“We used Always Best Care of Macomb County for my friend and they were wonderful. We chose them because they had a little edge on the caregiving model that they use and they negotiated the price with us. The caregivers were professional and prompt. They provided my friend with companionship, helped with feeding, and they were available at night for nighttime issues that arose. They were also there to pass meds to her, to facilitate her taking her anti-anxiety pills, and to reassure her. They were always prompt in returning my phone calls and they kept a notebook so we could communicate. They solicited feedback too.”

Cindy
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“Good review Good review Good review Good review Good review Good review”

Mr. -.
 In-Home Care Harrison Charter Township, MI

How does In-home Senior Care in Harrison Charter Township, MI work?

Home is where the heart is. While that saying can sound a tad cliche, it's especially true for many seniors living in America. When given a choice, older adults most often prefer to grow older at home. An AARP study found that three out of four adults over the age of 50 want to stay in their homes and communities as they age. When you begin to think about why, it makes sense. Home offers a sense of security, comfort, and familiarity.

The truth is, as we age, we begin to rely on others for help. When a family is too busy or lives too far away to fulfill this role, in-home senior care is often the best solution. Home care services allow seniors to enjoy personal independence while also receiving trustworthy assistance from a trained caregiver.

At Always Best Care, we offer a comprehensive range of home care services to help seniors stay healthy while they get the help they need to remain independent. As your senior loved one ages, giving them the gift of senior care is one of the best ways to show your love, even if you live far away.

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 Senior Care Harrison Charter Township, MI

Aging in Place: The Preferred Choice for Most Seniors

While it's true that some seniors have complicated medical needs that prevent them from staying at home, aging in place is often the best arrangement for seniors and their families. With a trusted caregiver, seniors have the opportunity to live with a sense of dignity and do so as they see fit.

In-home care makes it possible for millions of seniors to age in place every year. Rather than moving to a unfamiliar assisted living community, seniors have the chance to stay at home where they feel the happiest and most comfortable.

Here are just a few of the reasons why older men and women prefer to age at home:

Comfort
Comfort

How much does a senior's home truly mean to them? A study published by the American Society on Aging found that more than half of seniors say their home's emotional value means more than how much their home is worth in monetary value. It stands to reason, that a senior's home is where they want to grow old. With the help of elderly care in Harrison Charter Township, MI, seniors don't have to age in a sterilized care facility. Instead, they can age gracefully in the place they want to be most: their home. In contrast, seniors who move to a long-term care facility must adapt to new environments, new people, and new systems that the facility implements. At this stage in life, this kind of drastic change can be more harmful than helpful.

Healthy Living
Healthy Living

Institutional care facilities like nursing homes often put large groups of people together to live in one location. On any given day, dozens of staff members and caregivers run in and out of these facilities. Being around so many new people in a relatively small living environment can be dangerous for a seniors' health and wellbeing. When you consider that thousands of seniors passed away in nursing homes during the COVID-19 pandemic, opting for in-home care is often a safer, healthier choice for seniors. Aging in place has been shown to improve seniors' quality of life, which helps boost physical health and also helps insulate them from viral and bacterial risks found in elderly living facilities.

Independence
Independence

For many seniors, the ability to live independently with assistance from a caregiver is a priceless option. With in-home care, seniors experience a higher level of independence and freedom - much more so than in other settings like an assisted living community. When a senior has the chance to age in place, they get to live life on their own terms, inside the house that they helped make into a home. More independence means more control over their personal lives, too, which leads to increased levels of fulfillment, happiness, and personal gratification. Over time, these positive feelings can manifest into a healthier, longer life.

Cost and Convenience
Cost and Convenience

More independence, a healthier life, and increased comfort are only a few benefits of aging in place. You have to take into consideration the role of cost and convenience. Simply put, it's usually easier to help seniors age in place than it is to move them into an institutional care facility. In-home care services from Always Best Care, for instance, can be less expensive than long-term solutions, which can cost upwards of six figures per year. To make matters worse, many residential care facilities are reluctant to accept long-term care insurance and other types of payment assistance.

With Always Best Care's home care services, seniors and their families have a greater level of control over their care plans. In-home care in Harrison Charter Township, MI gives seniors the chance to form a bond with a trusted caregiver and also receive unmatched care that is catered to their needs. In long-term care facilities, seniors and their loved ones have much less control over their care plan and have less of a say in who provides their care.

Empowers Seniors

Affordable Care Plans

In-home care is a valuable resource that empowers seniors to age in place on their own terms. However, a big concern for many families and their loved ones is how much in-home care costs. If you're worried that in-home care is too expensive, you may be pleasantly surprised to learn that it is one of the most affordable senior care arrangements available.

Typically, hiring an Always Best Care in-home caregiver for a few hours a week is more affordable than sending your loved one to a long-term care facility. This is true even for seniors with more complex care needs.

At Always Best Care, we will work closely with you and your family to develop a Care Plan that not only meets your care needs, but your budget requirements, too. Once we discover the level of care that you or your senior need, we develop an in-home care plan that you can afford.

In addition to our flexible care options, families should also consider the following resources to help offset potential home care costs:

Veteran's Benefits
Veteran's Benefits

Aid and Attendance benefits through military service can cover a portion of the costs associated with in-home care for veterans and their spouses.

Long-Term Care Insurance
Long-Term Care Insurance

Many senior care services like in-home care are included in long-term care insurance options. Research different long-term care solutions to find a plan that provides coverage for senior care.

Private Insurance
Private Insurance

Home care can be included as part of a senior's private insurance plan. Read over your loved one's insurance policy carefully or speak with their insurance provider to determine if in-home care is covered.

Life Insurance
Life Insurance

Depending on the life insurance plan, you may be able to apply your policy toward long-term care. You may be able to use long-term-care coverage to help pay for in-home elderly care.


Respite Care Harrison Charter Township, MI

During your Care Plan consultation with Always Best Care, your Care Coordinator will speak with you about in-home care costs and what options there may be to help meet your budget needs.

Compassionate Care. Trusted Caregivers

When you or your senior loved one needs assistance managing daily tasks at home, finding a qualified caregiver can be challenging. It takes a special kind of person to provide reliable care for your senior loved one. However, a caregiver's role involves more than meal preparation and medication reminders. Many seniors rely on their caregivers for companionship, too.

Our companion care services give seniors the chance to socialize in a safe environment and engage in activities at home. These important efforts boost morale and provide much-needed relief from repetitive daily routines. A one-on-one, engaging conversation can sharpen seniors' minds and give them something in which to be excited.

At Always Best Care, we only hire care providers that we would trust to care for our own loved ones. Our senior caregivers in Harrison Charter Township,MI understand how important it is to listen and communicate with their seniors. A seemingly small interaction, like a short hug goodbye, can make a major difference in a senior's day. Instead of battling against feelings of isolation, seniors begin to look forward to seeing their caregiver each week.

Understanding the nuances of senior care is just one of the reasons why our care providers are so great at their job.

Unlike some senior care companies, our caregivers must undergo extensive training before they work for Always Best Care. In addition, our caregivers receive ongoing training throughout the year. This training ensures that their standard of care matches up to the high standards we've come to expect. During this training, they will brush up on their communication skills, safety awareness, and symptom spotting. That way, your loved one receives the highest level of non-medical home care from day one.

 Caregivers Harrison Charter Township, MI

Taking the First Step with Always Best Care

The first step in getting quality in-home care starts with a personal consultation with an experienced Care Coordinator. This initial consultation is crucial for our team to learn more about you or your elderly loved one to discover the level of care required. Topics of this consultation typically include:

An assessment of your senior loved one

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An in-depth discussion of the needs of your senior loved one to remain in their own home

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Reviewing a detailed Care Plan that will meet your senior loved one's needs

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Our caregivers are trained to spot changes that clients exhibit, like mental and physical decline. As your trusted senior care company, we will constantly assess and update your Care Plan to meet any new emotional, intellectual, physical, and emotional needs.

If you have never considered in-home care before, we understand that you and your family may have concerns about your Care Plan and its Care Coordinator. To help give you peace of mind, know that every team member and caregiver must undergo comprehensive training before being assigned to a Care Plan.

When you're ready, we encourage you to contact your local Always Best Care representative to set up a Care Consultation. Our Care Coordinators would be happy to meet with you in person to get to know you better, discuss your needs, and help put together a personalized Care Plan specific to your needs.

Latest News in Harrison Charter Township, MI

Seven possible Macomb County news stories that could play out in 2023

That went fast.The pages of the calendar for 2022 flipped by lickety split and 2023 is already here.Thinking ahead, here is a quick list of things that could come in the New Year:1) Mayoral showdown in WarrenFor local political junkies, this is going to be an exciting year in Macomb’s most-populated city.A variety of the city’s political heavyweights are expected to throw their hat into the proverbial ring including City Council President Patrick Green, state Rep. Lori Stone, other council mem...

That went fast.

The pages of the calendar for 2022 flipped by lickety split and 2023 is already here.

Thinking ahead, here is a quick list of things that could come in the New Year:

1) Mayoral showdown in Warren

For local political junkies, this is going to be an exciting year in Macomb’s most-populated city.

A variety of the city’s political heavyweights are expected to throw their hat into the proverbial ring including City Council President Patrick Green, state Rep. Lori Stone, other council members such as Angela Rogensues, and even Fouts himself.

The question is, will Fouts be on the ballot?

Voters approved a charter amendment in 2020 that imposes term limits for the mayor’s position. A mayor can only serve three four-year terms, or 12 years, in office like the rest of the city’s elected officials.

The 80-year-old Fouts recently was quoted by the Warren Weekly as saying his name will be on 2023 ballot. If he is successful, that would result in an unprecedented fifth term.

According to the newspaper report, Fouts says he has received more than a 70% approval rating in polling, while other potential candidates garnered single digit positives.

“I think the people support what I am doing,” Fouts told the Warren Weekly.

He was first elected to the City Council in 1981 and served 26 years. When this, his fourth term as mayor draws to a close, he will been at the city’s helm for 16 years.

No doubt Fouts’ biggest selling points are his availability to residents — he is known for answering resident’s phone calls late into the night — and overseeing all department heads with an iron first.

But if he is disqualified for term limits, political consultants say Green or Stone would be the front-runners.

Stone was just elected to her second term in Lansing, but would be the city’s first female mayor if she ran and won the position. Green has a large amount of institutional support among city workers, which could translate into votes in a mayoral run.

To add further intrigue, a Green-Stone contest would be, in boxing terms, a rubber match, after each one election.

Green beat Stone in the August 2016 Democratic primary election for the Michigan House of Representatives and won a seat in the general election. Two years later, she returned the favor by defeating Green in the August primary and went on to win in November.

Sounds like a potentially interesting scenario.

Consultant Michael Radtke says either way, it will be a “lively primary” this summer.

“Personally, I think it’s time for a new generation of leadership in Warren,” said Radtke, who is also a member of the Sterling Heights City Council.

Stay tuned.

2) Paradise on Lake St. Clair

It’s hard to believe Gino’s Surf and Luna Kai Bar & Grill in Harrison Township has been closed for seven years now.

The landmark venue Jefferson south of Metropolitan Parkway been an iconic facility for generations, hosting weddings, graduation parties and other events. It closed in August 2015 as part of a bankruptcy proceeding.

Now comes a team of investors headed by Harrison Township business entrepreneur Brian Jeffries who are putting together what looks to be a compelling recipe of casual elegance combined with waterfront ambience.

They include Awsem Zbair, Isam Sami, Fikry Gejou, Farqad Sami, and Jeffries, who is internationally known by his alter ego, DJ Godfather, a master of electronic music festivals.

They’ve been working on the project for a couple of years, although delayed by the pandemic. The group says even they want to open as soon as possible, they are taking their time with the design, menu, and atmosphere of the place.

Plans call for a remodeled outdoor patio with huge artsy structures that can be seen from a mile out on the water, the addition of up to 30 boat slips, a renovated banquet center, and 44 new big-screen TVs in the bar area.

According to Jeffries, the idea is to make Gino’s Surf a high-end sports-themed restaurant/bar with live entertainment and a next-door banquet facility. It likely will be open year-round.

Jeffries predicted it will be a gathering spot for sailors and landlubbers alike.

Also, the team has acquired a field right next to Gino’s parking lot that they may convert into a landscaped garden area that will be ideal for wedding photographs.

“Once it gets done, it’s definitely going to be a destination spot not only for Harrison Township, but for all of Macomb County and beyond,” he said. “We’re very excited.”

3) Ciao Italia

A new restaurant featuring Italian and American food will take its place along Gratiot Avenue in Roseville beginning Tuesday.

Joe’s Italian Grill replaces the long-vacant Noni’s Grill south of 12 Mile Road, giving Rosevillians a 4,000-square-foot casual, sitdown place to eat adorned black linen tablecloths, and an outdoor patio.

“We want to provide great food and customer service at a blue collar price for a working man community,” said Charles Whisnant, the general manager.

Owner Joseph DeFelice says he is offering an alternative to the fast-food hamburger-and-chicken joints crowding up Gratiot Avenue that is open a little bit later into the night.

“We have all these chain restaurants around, but we wanted to give the people a better meal than they would get at a corporate chain eatery,” said DeFelice, who serves as secretary for the Roseville Community Schools Board of Education.

The two-sided menu features all the Italian dishes you can think of, including spaghetti and meatballs, several versions of pizza, fettuccini Alfredo, and gnocchi parmigiana, along with a range of classic American steaks, sandwiches, and salads.

Joe’s expects to have a liquor license in place by February for diners who care to enjoy a glass of wine or beer with their dinner.

It also has a drive-through window that will not be used right away but will be available in case another pandemic breaks out.

4) Farewell to Dooleys

Dooleys Tavern, another longtime gathering spot in Roseville, is expected to be replaced by Macomb County’s first Lee’s Famous Recipe Chicken in the New Year.

Longtime owner Frank Sgroi Jr. said he is retiring from the entertainment business and moving to Mexico. He said he has sold the venue.

“It’s being purchased by the owner of Leo’s Coney Island across the street,” he said recently in a text. “They are remodeling it to be a Lee’s Famous Recipe Chicken franchise.”

Lee’s is a quick-service restaurant chain that offers broasted chicken along with other tasty treats such as chicken pot pie, country-fried steak, BBQ chicken sandwiches, and about 20 sides including mashed potatoes, mac and cheese, and baked beans.

Sgroi shut down Dooleys following the fatal shooting of a doorman in February 2002.

5) Dress it up

Is there anything planned yet for the little parcel of vacant land that used to house the Macomb County parking garage in downtown Mount Clemens?

Apparently not.

The 2.3-acre of property north of the Circuit Court has been empty since the structure was demolished in 2016. It was part of a $65 million renovation project at the county’s Mount Clemens campus.

Deputy County Executive Mark Deldin said there are no plans currently in the works.

“Given it is adjacent to other county facilities the plan is to determine future needs as the county population continues to expand,” he said in an email.

We’re completely on board with getting the best use of the property near the Clinton River. But in the meantime, it seems logical to use it for something – to host art displays, maybe a temporary ice rink, and even accept donations to make it into a park.

Something is always better than nothing.

Maybe 2023 will be the year elected officials in Macomb and Oakland counties put aside their name-calling and finger-pointing over pollution of Lake St. Clair and come up with a realistic solution.

The lake’s shoreline for decades has been has been plagued with out-of-control algae growth and closed beaches due to contaminants in the water.

Many suspect that’s due to Oakland County dumping sewage combined with storm water into the Red Run in Madison Heights during heavy rain events. Partially treated or raw sewage flows through the drain into Sterling Heights and Warren, into the Clinton River and ultimately into Lake St. Clair, impacting water quality.

Oakland County Water Resources Commissioner Jim Nash in December said he has been working on a regional collaboration initiative that takes a scientific approach to finding the causes of the pollution. He said Macomb and Wayne counties are on board with the concept, as is SEMCOG.

“We need to stop yelling at each other,” he said.

Macomb County Public Works Commissioner Candice Miller supports a task force approach.

Nash expects the task force will get going in 2023.

Warren Mayor Jim Fouts has said he may have to resort to a lawsuit or building a dam to prevent sewage overflows from entering the Red Run Drain. The county board in October passed a resolution urging Oakland officials to invest in steps to reduce sewer discharges.

7) The Clem’s growth continues

The past 12 months saw a number of businesses making downtown Mount Clemens their home. The trend looks like it will continue for 2023

Black Cat Coffee Shop, Clementine’s Pastries, Switalski Law, and Capture a Moment Photography are among the shops and offices that have opened.

Scheduled to open in the coming weeks are Escapology Escape Room and Kawaii Bubble Tea, along with the Painted Lady tattoo parlor and a restaurant/bar both located in the former Salad Garden as part of the John Van Camp building.

Initially, part of the old Salad Garden development was going to have the restaurant located at the corner of Macomb Place and North Walnut Street.

But retired Macomb County Judge Mark Switalski and his wife, former assistant prosecutor and Waterford Township district court judge, Jodi Debbrecht Switalski, swooped in and took over the property. They’ve retained the original tin roof and exposed brick walls, and added large windows to the reception area,

Must-try restaurants on the water in Harrison Township this summer

HARRISON TOWNSHIP — The changing Michigan weather shuts down boats and seasonal restaurants each year, but they’re all ready to set sail as summer kicks in.Boaters and families can now enjoy their favorite establishments with a view that isn’t snow and ice, while they listen to live music and enjoy the rising temperatures.In Harrison Township, waterfront restaurants are welcoming patrons back as boaters can once again dock at their favorite restaurants.Restaurants at Macray Harbor (seasonal) 30675 N. Ri...

HARRISON TOWNSHIP — The changing Michigan weather shuts down boats and seasonal restaurants each year, but they’re all ready to set sail as summer kicks in.

Boaters and families can now enjoy their favorite establishments with a view that isn’t snow and ice, while they listen to live music and enjoy the rising temperatures.

In Harrison Township, waterfront restaurants are welcoming patrons back as boaters can once again dock at their favorite restaurants.

Restaurants at Macray Harbor (seasonal) 30675 N. River Road (586) 468-1900 macray.com/restaurant

Featuring N42 Bar + Grille, Macray Harbor added an upstairs restaurant, The Helm, this year. It’s set to open on Father’s Day, and it brings a more elegant and intimate atmosphere, while also offering dinner with a view.

Menu items will include Great Lakes perch, lamb chops, and lobster ravioli. The Helm will also have a brunch menu on Sundays until 2 p.m. with chocolate banana bread, chorizo egg rolls, and stuffed French toast headlining the menu.

The N42 Bar + Grille showcased its revitalized outside area with a brand-new tiki bar for patrons to enjoy.

Live music and a DJ can be enjoyed on the weekends.

No docks will be available for boaters, as the restaurant can only be reached by land vehicles. Hours of operation: 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sunday through Thursday, and 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Friday and Saturday.

Octopus’ Beer Garden (seasonal) 152 N. River Road (586) 221-1531 octopusbeergarden.com

It goes with the name.

A tribute to the Beatles, Octopus’ Beer Garden provides a peaceful view of the water with extensive menu options. Flowers are positioned all around the restaurant for a unique and calm aesthetic.

The bestselling mahi-mahi tacos, along with various sandwiches and fresh seafood choices are just a few of the many items available.

“You can pair your Midwestern summer foods with your favorite Midwestern summer beers,” owner Chef Bob Halaas said.

Patrons can enjoy live music Tuesday through Thursday from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m., while staying warm alongside the patio fire pits. A Paul McCartney tribute band will be playing from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. June 18 in celebration of the legendary musician’s 80th birthday.

Octopus’ Beer Garden offers 12 slips specifically for 30-foot boats.

Hours of operation: 3 p.m. to 10 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday; noon to 11 p.m. Friday and Saturday; noon to 10 p.m. Sunday. Closed Monday.

Bumpers Landing (year-round) 31970 N. River Road (586) 630-0501 bumperslandingmi.com

One of the more dynamic restaurants in the area, Bumpers Landing has brought on its summer menu for the 2022 season. The appealing outdoor patio is perfect for watching baseball games on the tiki bar televisions.

Boaters have 26 docks to choose from with a couple hundred feet of seawall.

The menu features a classic American feel with their famous pizza, but creative burger options and the lobster sandwich offer a unique twist.

In the winter, Bumpers Landing offers more seasonal items such as pot pies and daily pot roast dinners.

Live music can be enjoyed Wednesday through Sunday starting at 6:30 p.m.

Hours of operation: 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Sunday through Thursday, and 11 a.m. to midnight Friday and Saturday.

Crews Inn (year-round) 31988 N. River Road (586) 463-8144

With an extensive wine list and prime rib, the menu speaks for itself.

Crews Inn offers both indoor and outdoor dining, with seating available at the tiki bar, as well.

The menu’s options include perch, crab cakes, clam chowder, and prime rib available Thursday through Saturday.

Patrons can enjoy live music on Thursdays beginning at 5 p.m., and on Sundays starting at 3 p.m.

Customer service is something manager Tom Moons said his team prides itself on.

“They can expect really good food and experience a really great dining experience,” Moons said. “Our service is something we really focus on, and our customers can expect that.”

Crews Inn offers eight slips for boaters.

Hours of operation: 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. every day.

Former L’Anse Creuse property to be developed into condos in Harrison Twp.

A prime piece of real estate in Harrison Township that for decades was focused on children’s education is set to become a multi-million dollar condo complex.Mount Clemens-based Holsbeke Investments received conditional rezoning for a 4.5-acre parcel of property on the west side of Jefferson Avenue between L’Anse Creuse and Ponchartrain streets, from low density single family residential to multiple family residential.The land used to house L’Anse Creuse Public Schools property. It is just north of a commercial...

A prime piece of real estate in Harrison Township that for decades was focused on children’s education is set to become a multi-million dollar condo complex.

Mount Clemens-based Holsbeke Investments received conditional rezoning for a 4.5-acre parcel of property on the west side of Jefferson Avenue between L’Anse Creuse and Ponchartrain streets, from low density single family residential to multiple family residential.

The land used to house L’Anse Creuse Public Schools property. It is just north of a commercial area that houses Luigi’s Original, Jefferson Street Pub, Terry’s Terrace, marinas, and other businesses.

“It’s an unique area,” said developer Christopher Holsbeke. “It’s close to everything, it’s close to the water, it’s close to shopping, and it’s part of a great school district.”

Holsbeke plans to construct a 28-unit condominium development, consisting of townhouses and ranches. He’s looking at under $300,000 as a price point for the units which will be between 1,500- and 1,800-square feet.

Holsbeke said in talking with friends and family in the lakefront community south of 16 Mile Road that more people were buying homes in Arizona and Florida, but still wanted to have a presence in Harrison Township. He said his research showed more people are choosing to live alone and don’t want the cost and worry of a large house to maintain.

The property used to be home to Jefferson Elementary School and then the L’Anse Creuse Public Schools Administration building before being closed and demolished. Then it sat vacant for a number of years before Holsbeke purchased it.

“I looked at that property and saw it has sat for a long time,” he said. “The developers wanted to do Section 8 (public) housing or apartments. That’s not conducive to what is going to happen in the future to that area.”

Township officials have designated the Crocker Boulevard-Jefferson community as a downtown district plans to eventually add more lake access, bars and eateries, and shopping opportunities. That’s one of the reasons why Holsbeke said he chose to build near the upcoming downtown area.

Ken Verkest, township supervisor, said the condo project is more “in tune” with an entertainment district.

“It’s a really nice piece of property, a deep parcel,” Verkest said.

He called the development a “real boost for the neighborhood.

“The reality is there is a segment of our population that doesn’t want single-family housing. Having a condo is less worrisome and maintenance that a house. It’s a popular form of housing,” Verkest said.

As part of the conditional rezoning process, the developer agreed to downsize from 32 to 28 units. One of the conditions tied to the rezoning limits the number of units to six that be rental units. No subsidized housing will be allowed onsite, according to the conditional rezoning agreement.

An existing child care building will be renovated and sold, officials said.

Holsbeke said he plans to begin construction in the spring of 2023.

Mittelstedt is Harrison Township’s new deputy supervisor

HARRISON TOWNSHIP — It is “new year, new deputy” for the Harrison Township Supervisor’s Office.Following the election of Joseph Aragona to the Michigan House of Representatives, the position of Harrison Township’s deputy supervisor was left vacant. By the time 2023 rolled around, Stephanie Mittelstedt was selected and ready to fill the role.Mittelstedt brings experience from both the private and municipal sectors. She was first exposed to municipal government through her work with the Sterling Heig...

HARRISON TOWNSHIP — It is “new year, new deputy” for the Harrison Township Supervisor’s Office.

Following the election of Joseph Aragona to the Michigan House of Representatives, the position of Harrison Township’s deputy supervisor was left vacant. By the time 2023 rolled around, Stephanie Mittelstedt was selected and ready to fill the role.

Mittelstedt brings experience from both the private and municipal sectors. She was first exposed to municipal government through her work with the Sterling Heights Regional Chamber of Commerce.

“You got to meet a lot of local government (officials while) working with the chamber and doing local community events,” Mittelstedt said. “Prior to that, I had marketing positions in hospitality, and before that, I was blessed enough to be a stay-at-home mom for about seven years.”

Mittelstedt made connections with the chamber through her marketing work for restaurants, eventually getting into municipal government positions in Clinton Township. It was the relative stability of municipal jobs that made the switch from hospitality attractive to Mittelstedt.

“I am a mom, and the hospitality industry doesn’t have nice hours,” Mittelstedt said. “Sometimes it’s not a good support for a family, and I was looking for something a little bit more stable. I don’t want to keep hopping around from place to place; I want to move forward with my career.”

Mittelstedt began her work with Clinton Township in 2019, where she worked as an administrative assistant and served on several committees.

She came to Harrison Township at the urging of Township Supervisor Ken Verkest not long after the 2022 election results were in.

“Supervisor Verkest contacted me around Thanksgiving (or) early December and suggested me the opportunity,” Mittelstedt said. “I had previously worked with Joe Aragona … He was a trustee for me at Clinton Township. (Aragona) knew my work ethic and the things I do, and when Ken suggested me, Joe approached me and asked if I would be interested, and I sat down and was very honored to be offered the position.”

According to Mittelstedt, the role in Harrison Township is not too different from her role in Clinton Township. However, the size difference between the townships means Mittelstedt will be more involved with the government’s functions.

“I will be handling a lot more one-on-one things where we used to have department heads in Clinton Township that would do them,” Mittelstedt said. “I’m kind of an extension of Ken’s arm, if you will. I will be the liaison when he is in another meeting or he is unavailable. I’ll be the point person so that residents have someone to reach out to and talk to. … I’m going to be an extension of Ken.”

Harrison Township’s small size and the prospect of a more direct involvement with the government and residents is a plus for Mittelstedt, a Fraser native and an Armada resident who sees this as a return to her small-town roots.

“I’m excited, now that I’ve been with Clinton Township for four years, to learn local government from the other side — from the smaller side of things and get back to my roots where, honestly, I am more comfortable,” Mittelstedt said.

Mittelstedt believes having connections with Harrison Township’s surrounding communities will help with finding options and helping out the township while she is in the position of deputy supervisor, a role she said she hopes to keep for as long as she can.

Mittelstedt can be reached by Harrison Township residents on weekdays from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the township offices, located at 38151 L’Anse Creuse Street. She can be reached by email at [email protected] and by calling the township Supervisor’s Office at (586) 466-1445.

Harrison Twp. planners to act on proposed $20 million senior development

The Harrison Township Planning Commission will hold another public hearing Thursday night on a proposed $20 million independent living facility near a hospital that has been closed for years.Common Sail Investment Group of Brighton wants to construct a three-story, 80-unit building on the 26700 block of Ballard Street, east of Jefferson Avenue. Developer Earl Stilson owns the 5.2-acre property.A spokesperson for Common Sail said the development cost ranges from $19.5 million to $20.5 million.“Common Sail Developmen...

The Harrison Township Planning Commission will hold another public hearing Thursday night on a proposed $20 million independent living facility near a hospital that has been closed for years.

Common Sail Investment Group of Brighton wants to construct a three-story, 80-unit building on the 26700 block of Ballard Street, east of Jefferson Avenue. Developer Earl Stilson owns the 5.2-acre property.

A spokesperson for Common Sail said the development cost ranges from $19.5 million to $20.5 million.

“Common Sail Development is committed to serving the senior population and believe the site, with its adjacency to the Tucker Senior Center, is an optimal location to provide quality affordable housing to the area’s aging population,” Eric Tuomey, vice president of development, said in a statement.

Common Sail proposes to build the facility as part of a planned unit development (PUD). As part of a PUD, the project must provide a public benefit.

To that end, the company would pave a portion of Ballard that runs along its property line. Ballard currently has only part of the road paved, with the remainder a gravel aggregate.

The site is near the former St. John North Shores Hospital, which has been closed for years.

This is the second time the planning panel will review the project. Last month, about 15 residents spoke, largely in opposition to the plan, according to minutes of the meeting.

Township Treasurer Lawrence Tomenello said the residents’ concerns centered on the height of the building, the density, and whether there would be enough parking spaces. He said many homeowners have resided in the community a long time.

“We found out that many residents who live purchased their homes from their parents after growing up there and there’s an emotional attachment to the street and residential community,” he said. “Change is always scary but sometimes hard to stop. We are looking for a reasonable solution that both sides can live with.”

According to Tomenello, who serves as the township board liaison to the planning commission, there are 55 one-bedroom units and 25 two-bedroom units planned. The rent, which would be subsidized by the state, would be based on the person’s income.

The facility would house people 55 and over, and would provide the township with sorely needed senior housing, officials said.

Common Sail Development specializes in the development and construction of multi-family housing. It is part of Common Sail Investment Group family of companies serving the senior living and healthcare industries.

If the planning commission approves the rezoning and site plan, the issue would then go before the township’s Board of Trustees for final determination.

Plans call for construction to begin in the spring of 2023, with occupancy expected later that summer.

Thursday’s meeting begins at 7 p.m. at Rosso Hall. 38255 L’Anse Creuse.

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