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Given the choice, most of us want to stay in our homes. Sometimes, people need help to remain at home. That's where Always Best Care Senior Services comes in.

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“Words cannot express how grateful we are for your companies services. We know it can be difficult to schedule around changing situations. We appreciate your flexibility and the care and compassion shown for my mother. A special thanks to your team.”

Marci
 In-Home Care Bayport, MN

How does In-home Senior Care in Bayport, MN work?

Home is where the heart is. While that saying can sound a tad cliche, it's especially true for many seniors living in America. When given a choice, older adults most often prefer to grow older at home. An AARP study found that three out of four adults over the age of 50 want to stay in their homes and communities as they age. When you begin to think about why, it makes sense. Home offers a sense of security, comfort, and familiarity.

The truth is, as we age, we begin to rely on others for help. When a family is too busy or lives too far away to fulfill this role, in-home senior care is often the best solution. Home care services allow seniors to enjoy personal independence while also receiving trustworthy assistance from a trained caregiver.

At Always Best Care, we offer a comprehensive range of home care services to help seniors stay healthy while they get the help they need to remain independent. As your senior loved one ages, giving them the gift of senior care is one of the best ways to show your love, even if you live far away.

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 Senior Care Bayport, MN

Aging in Place: The Preferred Choice for Most Seniors

While it's true that some seniors have complicated medical needs that prevent them from staying at home, aging in place is often the best arrangement for seniors and their families. With a trusted caregiver, seniors have the opportunity to live with a sense of dignity and do so as they see fit.

In-home care makes it possible for millions of seniors to age in place every year. Rather than moving to a unfamiliar assisted living community, seniors have the chance to stay at home where they feel the happiest and most comfortable.

Here are just a few of the reasons why older men and women prefer to age at home:

Comfort
Comfort

How much does a senior's home truly mean to them? A study published by the American Society on Aging found that more than half of seniors say their home's emotional value means more than how much their home is worth in monetary value. It stands to reason, that a senior's home is where they want to grow old. With the help of elderly care in Bayport, MN, seniors don't have to age in a sterilized care facility. Instead, they can age gracefully in the place they want to be most: their home. In contrast, seniors who move to a long-term care facility must adapt to new environments, new people, and new systems that the facility implements. At this stage in life, this kind of drastic change can be more harmful than helpful.

Healthy Living
Healthy Living

Institutional care facilities like nursing homes often put large groups of people together to live in one location. On any given day, dozens of staff members and caregivers run in and out of these facilities. Being around so many new people in a relatively small living environment can be dangerous for a seniors' health and wellbeing. When you consider that thousands of seniors passed away in nursing homes during the COVID-19 pandemic, opting for in-home care is often a safer, healthier choice for seniors. Aging in place has been shown to improve seniors' quality of life, which helps boost physical health and also helps insulate them from viral and bacterial risks found in elderly living facilities.

Independence
Independence

For many seniors, the ability to live independently with assistance from a caregiver is a priceless option. With in-home care, seniors experience a higher level of independence and freedom - much more so than in other settings like an assisted living community. When a senior has the chance to age in place, they get to live life on their own terms, inside the house that they helped make into a home. More independence means more control over their personal lives, too, which leads to increased levels of fulfillment, happiness, and personal gratification. Over time, these positive feelings can manifest into a healthier, longer life.

Cost and Convenience
Cost and Convenience

More independence, a healthier life, and increased comfort are only a few benefits of aging in place. You have to take into consideration the role of cost and convenience. Simply put, it's usually easier to help seniors age in place than it is to move them into an institutional care facility. In-home care services from Always Best Care, for instance, can be less expensive than long-term solutions, which can cost upwards of six figures per year. To make matters worse, many residential care facilities are reluctant to accept long-term care insurance and other types of payment assistance.

With Always Best Care's home care services, seniors and their families have a greater level of control over their care plans. In-home care in Bayport, MN gives seniors the chance to form a bond with a trusted caregiver and also receive unmatched care that is catered to their needs. In long-term care facilities, seniors and their loved ones have much less control over their care plan and have less of a say in who provides their care.

Empowers Seniors

Affordable Care Plans

In-home care is a valuable resource that empowers seniors to age in place on their own terms. However, a big concern for many families and their loved ones is how much in-home care costs. If you're worried that in-home care is too expensive, you may be pleasantly surprised to learn that it is one of the most affordable senior care arrangements available.

Typically, hiring an Always Best Care in-home caregiver for a few hours a week is more affordable than sending your loved one to a long-term care facility. This is true even for seniors with more complex care needs.

At Always Best Care, we will work closely with you and your family to develop a Care Plan that not only meets your care needs, but your budget requirements, too. Once we discover the level of care that you or your senior need, we develop an in-home care plan that you can afford.

In addition to our flexible care options, families should also consider the following resources to help offset potential home care costs:

Veteran's Benefits
Veteran's Benefits

Aid and Attendance benefits through military service can cover a portion of the costs associated with in-home care for veterans and their spouses.

Long-Term Care Insurance
Long-Term Care Insurance

Many senior care services like in-home care are included in long-term care insurance options. Research different long-term care solutions to find a plan that provides coverage for senior care.

Private Insurance
Private Insurance

Home care can be included as part of a senior's private insurance plan. Read over your loved one's insurance policy carefully or speak with their insurance provider to determine if in-home care is covered.

Life Insurance
Life Insurance

Depending on the life insurance plan, you may be able to apply your policy toward long-term care. You may be able to use long-term-care coverage to help pay for in-home elderly care.


Respite Care Bayport, MN

During your Care Plan consultation with Always Best Care, your Care Coordinator will speak with you about in-home care costs and what options there may be to help meet your budget needs.

Compassionate Care. Trusted Caregivers

When you or your senior loved one needs assistance managing daily tasks at home, finding a qualified caregiver can be challenging. It takes a special kind of person to provide reliable care for your senior loved one. However, a caregiver's role involves more than meal preparation and medication reminders. Many seniors rely on their caregivers for companionship, too.

Our companion care services give seniors the chance to socialize in a safe environment and engage in activities at home. These important efforts boost morale and provide much-needed relief from repetitive daily routines. A one-on-one, engaging conversation can sharpen seniors' minds and give them something in which to be excited.

At Always Best Care, we only hire care providers that we would trust to care for our own loved ones. Our senior caregivers in Bayport,MN understand how important it is to listen and communicate with their seniors. A seemingly small interaction, like a short hug goodbye, can make a major difference in a senior's day. Instead of battling against feelings of isolation, seniors begin to look forward to seeing their caregiver each week.

Understanding the nuances of senior care is just one of the reasons why our care providers are so great at their job.

Unlike some senior care companies, our caregivers must undergo extensive training before they work for Always Best Care. In addition, our caregivers receive ongoing training throughout the year. This training ensures that their standard of care matches up to the high standards we've come to expect. During this training, they will brush up on their communication skills, safety awareness, and symptom spotting. That way, your loved one receives the highest level of non-medical home care from day one.

 Caregivers Bayport, MN

Taking the First Step with Always Best Care

The first step in getting quality in-home care starts with a personal consultation with an experienced Care Coordinator. This initial consultation is crucial for our team to learn more about you or your elderly loved one to discover the level of care required. Topics of this consultation typically include:

An assessment of your senior loved one

01

An in-depth discussion of the needs of your senior loved one to remain in their own home

02

Reviewing a detailed Care Plan that will meet your senior loved one's needs

03

Our caregivers are trained to spot changes that clients exhibit, like mental and physical decline. As your trusted senior care company, we will constantly assess and update your Care Plan to meet any new emotional, intellectual, physical, and emotional needs.

If you have never considered in-home care before, we understand that you and your family may have concerns about your Care Plan and its Care Coordinator. To help give you peace of mind, know that every team member and caregiver must undergo comprehensive training before being assigned to a Care Plan.

When you're ready, we encourage you to contact your local Always Best Care representative to set up a Care Consultation. Our Care Coordinators would be happy to meet with you in person to get to know you better, discuss your needs, and help put together a personalized Care Plan specific to your needs.

Latest News in Bayport, MN

St. Croix's river cities on high alert as flood waters continue rising

BAYPORT, Minn. -- Water levels continue to rise putting river cities along the St. Croix on alert. Bayport city leaders said the last time the city saw significant flooding was in 2019 when the St. Croix crested at 88.5 feet.Currently, the water levels in Bayport match that of the St. Croix at Stillwater.As of late Monday morning, the National Weather service reported the St. Croix reached moderate flood stage at 88 feet, and Bayport city leaders said they're expecting it will rise another foot and a half to ma...

BAYPORT, Minn. -- Water levels continue to rise putting river cities along the St. Croix on alert. Bayport city leaders said the last time the city saw significant flooding was in 2019 when the St. Croix crested at 88.5 feet.

Currently, the water levels in Bayport match that of the St. Croix at Stillwater.

As of late Monday morning, the National Weather service reported the St. Croix reached moderate flood stage at 88 feet, and Bayport city leaders said they're expecting it will rise another foot and a half to major flood stage in the next couple of days.

Riverside Park has been a common place for people to stop and see the rising waters for themselves.

Currently, all the outfield at the baseball field and the benches are covered in water. Other park benches and grills are also starting to get submerged in water.

RELATED: Delano announces bridge and road closures as Crow River floods

Don Coakley has had a front row seat to spring flooding from his home in Bayport for nearly 30 years. He said he's seen the park flood often of times in the past but said this year might be different.

"Right now, if it gets that high it usually stays that way and then it recedes, but when it starts to cross the street it goes over that and then it will fill where the boats are here and then the water will start to come across the parking lot to towards our place and they're predicting it's going to get that bad," he said.

RELATED: Flooding causes road closures across Minnesota

City leaders said there's aren't many businesses right on the water other than marinas that would be affected by the rising water.

They said there will be some homes affected, but some of the newer homes here were also elevated when they were built, which should help.

People who live off of Front Street say they've seen flooding like this before. But as the levels continue to rise this week, there's concern that it could become historic, with major flooding here.

WCCO News' Derek James caught up with our very own Rebecca Kolls Monday, who is already having to take a different way of commuting to work: by canoe.

"A couple of years ago when the water came over the road, it was navigable by foot, except it was up to your knees, and all the carp would come in," Kolls said. "And that night, the carp munched on your legs, which was kind of really creepy."

Kolls is concerned for flooding like she's never experienced before.

"In 1964, the water was 689 feet…so that brought it into the house. This year, it's expected on Wednesday that it's going to crest at 689.5. That means I'll have over a foot of water in my lower level," she said.

And if you don't have a canoe, or it's too windy as has been the case the last couple of days, you basically ended up billygoating your way through your neighbor's yards to get home.

Kolls says she and her neighbors have been busy preparing as best they can.

"Quickly unloading the house and the garage and trying to save everything that's worth saving," she said.

Kolls' flood coverage kicked in just in the nick of time. But for others who don't have insurance, they're simply going to have to wait and see what the St. Croix does next.

City and school officials eye Barker’s Alps Park as possible site of new Bayport elementary school

The city of Bayport started leasing the area now known as Barker’s Alps Park from the state in the 1970s and purchased the 48-acre parcel in 1985.The land, formerly part of the Minnesota State prison farm lands, was “dedicated and set aside for park and recreational purposes,” according to the city ordinance that was enacted on May 6, 1985.Now, officials with Stillwater Area Public Schools are wondering whether the land — which is home to wooded hiking trails, a playground, picnic shelter, soccer fields ...

The city of Bayport started leasing the area now known as Barker’s Alps Park from the state in the 1970s and purchased the 48-acre parcel in 1985.

The land, formerly part of the Minnesota State prison farm lands, was “dedicated and set aside for park and recreational purposes,” according to the city ordinance that was enacted on May 6, 1985.

Now, officials with Stillwater Area Public Schools are wondering whether the land — which is home to wooded hiking trails, a playground, picnic shelter, soccer fields and baseball and softball fields — could become the new home of Andersen Elementary School.

City and school district officials plan to hold a public meeting in June to gauge public interest in such a plan, said Bayport Mayor Michele Hanson, who serves on the school district’s facilities planning team.

“I just feel like it would be a huge, huge hole in our community to not have a school here,” Hanson said. “We need (residents) to understand that we can’t keep it on the site where it is now because the school district is not going to do that — whether I want it or you want it. It’s not our choice, and the school district is not going to do that. The question is, do you want a park or do you want a school in the park?”

The district is considering a possible bond referendum in the fall to add capacity in the communities serving Andersen in Bayport and Lake Elmo Elementary and Oak-Land Middle School in Lake Elmo to address growth in the southern and central part of the district. The two oldest schools in the district are more than 100 years old — Andersen Elementary, which was built in 1919, and Lake Elmo Elementary, which was built in 1920 — and district officials have been looking at possibly building new elementary schools in Bayport/Baytown Township and Lake Elmo.

Bayport officials want to keep a school within city limits, and the meeting in June will give school district officials the chance to explain what’s happening, Hanson said. Meeting details have not been finalized.

“We want the community to understand the actual facts of what’s going on with that and then kind of help gauge their interest in using the park to keep the school in our community,” Hanson said. “No decisions have been made, but that is the only option that we could come up with to keep it in the Bayport city limits and still be a walkable school for at least a portion of residents.”

The city in 2019 acquired land along the St. Croix River for a park, which has not yet been developed, Hanson said. The 11-acre park — purchased with funds from the Land and Water Legacy fund — will eventually feature a new boat launch, boat-trailer parking, a picnic shelter, a walking trail, a canoe/kayak rack and a scenic lookout. It is located on 665 feet of riverfront shoreline in northern Bayport between Fourth Avenue North and Central Avenue.

“I think if people are reminded that we acquired new parkland recently and that we have that public open space, that might help,” she said.

Barker’s Alps already is home to soccer fields and baseball and softball fields — and those would remain open, as would walking trails and green space, she said.

“I don’t know how many people are really using it during the day, which is when they wouldn’t be able to use it now if it was school,” Hanson said, “So I feel like it’s not as huge of a loss as people may envision it to be.”

District officials interested

Superintendent Mike Funk said he’s not aware of any legal issue that would prevent the city of Bayport from selling the property to the school district.

“Just as the current school has served as a community asset for 100 years, a new facility — with expanded green spaces, fields and playgrounds and modern learning spaces and larger gathering spaces — would also be an asset to Bayport residents into the future,” Funk said. “We are excited about the possibilities it could offer to our students, staff and families.”

District officials want to build a new school within city limits if possible, said Carissa Keister, the district’s chief of staff and executive director of strategic communications.

“The community really has that strong desire, and we have a great relationship with Bayport, so we’d like to stay close,” she said. “There’s a lot of unique things that Andersen offers as far as being able to walk to the park or walk to the library or walk to Croixdale (senior center). They like that small-town feel, so that was really important.”

Expanding at Andersen in downtown Bayport is not feasible, she said. “We need to have green space, an area for kids to be able to do outdoor activities and have an outside-learning experience,” she said.

Safety and traffic flow at the school, located off Minnesota 95, is especially challenging at the end of the school day, she said.

“We need to have ample parking and a safe space for buses and parent pick-up and drop-off,” she said. “Having the kids not have to cross a major roadway to go to a bigger park across the street is really important.”

Minnesota Department of Education recommends that a building the size of Andersen Elementary should be on 15 acres of land, “and it’s on less than two acres where it is currently,” she said.

City officials have contacted the city’s local legislative representatives — Sen. Karin Housley and Rep. Josiah Hill — for help getting a bill passed to modify the use of the land to include “educational purposes,” Hanson said.

SF3301, which called for modifying use of land in Washington County, was introduced by Housley on April 26. It was referred to the State and Local Government and Veterans Committee, but did not proceed from there. A companion bill introduced by Hill also did not advance.

The Barker’s Alps hill used to attract the St. Paul Ski Club in the 1930s and 1940s, but reconstruction of Minnesota Highway 36 took a lot of dirt from Barker’s Alps, according to a story published in the Pioneer Press in 1995.

Stillwater developer wants horse farm annexed to Bayport for ‘green’ housing

A Stillwater development company known for its energy-efficient designs wants to build 46 single-family houses on a horse farm in Baytown Township, and they want the development to have a Bayport address.Green Halo Builds is proposing to build a planned-unit development on 26 acres of land near Barker’s Alps Park in Bayport. Company officials are in the process of having the land annexed into the city in order to provide the development with city water and sewer and zoning options that are not allowed in the township.The ...

A Stillwater development company known for its energy-efficient designs wants to build 46 single-family houses on a horse farm in Baytown Township, and they want the development to have a Bayport address.

Green Halo Builds is proposing to build a planned-unit development on 26 acres of land near Barker’s Alps Park in Bayport. Company officials are in the process of having the land annexed into the city in order to provide the development with city water and sewer and zoning options that are not allowed in the township.

The development, called EcoHaven, would be Green Halo Builds’ biggest project to date, said John Sharkey, the company’s CEO. The company is an “eco-friendly” builder, and each of the proposed 2,600-square-foot houses would be highly energy efficient, according to Sharkey.

“We’re committed to building environmentally sustainable homes achieving ‘net-zero’ energy use – or as close to it as possible,” Sharkey said. The company also prides itself on building “healthy” homes using materials and techniques that are safer for habitation, he said.

The houses will be designed for solar panels and will have advanced building envelope systems — structural insulated panels — to ensure they are airtight. The panels are just as strong as traditional stick framing, but are much more energy-efficient because the insulation isn’t interrupted by wood studs or rafters, Sharkey said.

“It’s a continuous wall of insulation,” he said. “A typical home has a stud every 16 inches, so that means every stud is an energy break – it’s touching the interior wall and the exterior wall. With SIP, we can run a wall for 24 feet without an energy break, and that translates into a higher R value and lower energy costs. Your house isn’t losing heat or losing air conditioning or working as hard.”

R-value is the measurement of an insulation material’s effectiveness in terms of its thermal resistance.

Owners wanted green development

Bradley and Janet Anderson, the owners of the horse farm, are winding down their equine venture and were interested in having a builder who uses green initiatives develop the site and houses, Sharkey said. “She came to me because she really likes what we are doing,” he said.

The farm, which includes a large meadow, is surrounded by mature trees.

“I had driven by that property hundreds of times, and I had no idea it was a horse ranch,” Sharkey said. “Once we walked up there and saw it, it was amazing. It has views of the St. Croix River Valley at certain times of the year. It’s rare for a property like this to become available.”

The development is designed to fit within the pasture area with minimal tree removal, according to Sharkey. “We’re not a builder that tries to pack them in there,” he said. “A green development works really well there. Each home backs up to trees. They’re very secluded and private.”

The home designs feature “main-level living” and have options for three- or four-bedrooms, he said. “We’re really big into outdoor spaces, four-season porches. When we design, we really look at every square foot of the home and try to have zero negative spaces. There is no wasted square footage.”

Bayport plan

Bayport City Administrator Matt Kline said Green Halo officials expect to submit a planned-unit development application within the next month, which will then be presented to the city’s planning commission and city council. The PUD application will be done concurrently with the annexation application, he said.

Bayport officials have requested several items in conjunction with the PUD application, including working with Washington County transportation officials on potential improvements needed at the the intersection of Stagecoach Trail North (Washington County Highway 21) and Fifth Avenue North (Washington County Highway 14); developing a shared-road agreement with Baytown Township; and coordinating an easement for sewer and water connections to Fifth Ave North, Kline said.

Green Halo hopes to break ground on EcoHaven later this year or in early 2024 and have residents moving into EcoHaven a year from now, Sharkey said. He anticipates a three-year build out.

Green Halo officials went to all the neighbors and asked if they wanted to join annexation as a courtesy, Sharkey said, and officials with the James B. and Christine N. Otto Trust asked that 1.5 acres of their land in Baytown Township – three lots in all – be included in the petition.

The properties are currently served by on-site septic and well systems.

Annexation by ordinance

State law allows for annexation to the city by adoption of an ordinance when a petition is made by all property owners for land that is 120 acres or less in area and not presently served by public sewer utilities. The Anderson property abuts the current city limits on its east boundary and meets the criteria for requirements for annexation by ordinance; the Otto lots also meet the criteria for annexation by ordinance provided the Anderson parcel is annexed, Kline said.

Baytown Township officials are “neither promoting nor objecting to the plan, but are staying on the sidelines waiting for the process to play out,” said Town Board Supervisor Rick Weyrauch.

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“The long-term position of the township desires to remain its current municipality as long as possible,” he said. “We’re tired of being eaten up. We like operating the township the way we do, and the residents hope to remain as we are into the foreseeable future.”

The township has restricted land development — 2 ½-acre minimum lot size requirements — and township officials would not consider “customizing” zoning ordinances for the development, he said.

Under township zoning regulations, the developer could have put 11 houses on the property, along with the road and cul de sac, said Town Board Chairman John Hall.

“When you look at this, townships don’t have a lot of defensive opportunities,” Hall said. “If the willing property owners are there, the township can’t really stop the annexation.”

Riverside residents watch, wait for floodwaters to recede

Rivers across the region — including the Mississippi, St. Croix and Red — continued to rise Friday, toward expected crests next week.Recent rain and snow didn’t help, but there is good news: After Friday, dry conditions are in the forecast for the next week.For most people in Minnesota and neighboring states, flooding doesn’t directly affect their homes or businesses. Levees and other flood protection measures built in recent decades have drastically reduced the damage and disruption caused by rising riv...

Rivers across the region — including the Mississippi, St. Croix and Red — continued to rise Friday, toward expected crests next week.

Recent rain and snow didn’t help, but there is good news: After Friday, dry conditions are in the forecast for the next week.

For most people in Minnesota and neighboring states, flooding doesn’t directly affect their homes or businesses. Levees and other flood protection measures built in recent decades have drastically reduced the damage and disruption caused by rising rivers each spring.

But for others, when the water gets as high as it has this year, it forces them to change the way they live.

Along the St. Croix River in Bayport, Minn., Mary Croft and her neighbors are uprooted. Croft can’t park in her garage, which she had to clear out ahead of the rising water. Boxes and other items from storage now occupy the upper levels of her home.

Croft, who’s 77, showed the way to the stairs down to her lower-level garage and storage space. But she could only make it a few steps because the garage floor is under several feet of splashing, swirling water.

Sitting at the dining room table, the river is right there, just outside the picture window. Croft joked that a friend of hers wants to fish off her deck, and he certainly could.

“We kind of at first didn't think it would be so bad,” she said.

The river is forecast to crest next week just upstream at Stillwater at 89.7 feet — the highest level recorded since 2001.

A week earlier, the St. Croix was still within its banks and the grass that separates the river from the condos was coming to life.

“It was turning green last week when it was sunny,” Croft recalled this week.

Where people walked just days ago, there’s now several feet of water, ducks paddling above driveways and lawns.

“I think people can't comprehend it,” Croft said. “I send pictures to my friends ... of the other buildings, and one of my friends said yesterday: ‘Are you in the water like that?’ And I said, ‘yeah.’”

After a frantic push to clean out all of the garages of those dozens of condos — now it’s a matter of waiting for the water to recede so the cleanup and return to normal can begin.

“I think the more worrying (thing) in a way, is how long we’re going to live under these conditions,” Croft said.

Hydrologist Craig Schmidt, with the National Weather Service’s Twin Cities office, said river levels will remain high for weeks. Recent rain and snow and rain delayed the expected crests of the St. Croix and Mississippi rivers in the Twin Cities from this week to next. Schmidt said the Red River will also soon crest at Fargo-Moorhead.

More on spring flooding

“We still have major flood stage on the Minnesota River. We’ve got it on the Crow, we’ve got it on the Mississippi, the St. Croix. We’ve got it up in the Red River Valley. It’s everywhere still,” he said Friday. “And we’re going to continue to rise in the main stems through this weekend and into next week.”

Schmidt said that after Friday, Minnesota is not expected to see much precipitation for the next several days — which he says will go a long way in helping to bring down water levels.

“All of next week looks pretty dry. So we’ve got a good five, seven, eight days of dry weather coming, which is great news for the rivers,” he said. “This period of fairly calm conditions should be a huge help to our rivers.”

Back in another small neighborhood along the flooded St. Croix — this one in Hudson, Wis. —several residents aren’t able to drive to or from their homes.

“There’s a road that goes all the way down there, but you know it’s all covered now," said Dan Krusell.

Krusell’s garage is high and dry — but he can’t get his car to his driveway. Which means lugging groceries or anything else he wants to move from his car to his home through other people’s property.

As Krusell sipped a cup of coffee, looking down toward the river from his patio, he talked about all of the stuff that’s been floating by.

“It gets to be a mess — logs, dock pieces, timbers, lifejackets, chairs — everything,” he said as he scanned the water. “Look at that — do you see way out there? It looks like a dock piece, too.”

Like people living along many rivers around the region, Krusell faces a lot of cleanup once the water recedes to normal levels — something that’s likely to be a weekslong process.

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Photos: St. Croix River nears major flood stage

Stillwater and surrounding communities are bracing for the St. Croix River to reach major flood stage this week.The flooding is already having major impacts as waters sweep over roads, reaching some homes and businesses."For weeks we’ve talked about the ‘worst case’ scenario for our spring flooding potential and it’s nearly panning out that way," said Bring Me The News Meteorologist Sven Sundgaard.Sundgaard expla...

Stillwater and surrounding communities are bracing for the St. Croix River to reach major flood stage this week.

The flooding is already having major impacts as waters sweep over roads, reaching some homes and businesses.

"For weeks we’ve talked about the ‘worst case’ scenario for our spring flooding potential and it’s nearly panning out that way," said Bring Me The News Meteorologist Sven Sundgaard.

Sundgaard explains much of northern Minnesota lost most of its snowpack all within last week as temperatures soared into the 60s and 70s. That caused several inches of stored water content (snow water equivalent) to move into the ground, rivers, and lakes.

"In addition, we saw more precipitation and snowfall over the weekend that will continue to melt Monday," he said.

According to Sundgaard, most rivers are either cresting now or will this week into the upcoming weekend just as the next big, slow-moving storm system moves in Wednesday.

"The rivers will very sensitive to this precipitation: where it falls and how much will be key," Sundgaard said. "We’re looking at a potential widespread 1 to 2 inches of precipitation over Wednesday and Thursday, lingering into Friday and Saturday."

On Monday morning, the St. Croix River in Stillwater measured 688.35' with major flood stage, 689', expected to be reached this week.

The latest National Weather Service hydrologic prediction models the river will crest in Stillwater at 689.8', which would be the highest flood waters since 2001 and the sixth highest level on record.

At the Bayport Marina just outside downtown Stillwater, employees scrambled to fill 1,000 sandbags and build a 120-foot dike in less than a day-and-a-half.

"The safest place for your boat during a flood is on land," reads an email sent to marina members. "If water levels got close to 692 we would need to start chaining the docks to the trees on land to hold them into place because they would be riding near the top of our piles. If boats were in the water it would be that much extra weight on the docks."

Water levels will need to recede to around 687' for boats to launch from the marina.

According to the NWS, the Lake Mallalieu dam gates will be overtopped once 689' is reached and Bayport will see more parkland flooded.

If the waters rose to 690', the flooding could begin to flood Highway 95 between Bayport and Afton.

"There's a lot of homeowners in Bayport, Afton, and Lakeland and everywhere in between that we could see some significant damage down there depending on how high the river goes, I'm certainly worried about our friends down there," Stillwater Mayor Ted Kozlowski told WCCO.

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