Learn more about in-home care options for your loved ones

Given the choice, most of us want to stay in our homes. Sometimes, people need help to remain at home. That's where Always Best Care Senior Services comes in.

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TESTIMONIALS

“Always Best Care comes in to help my dad a shower at night. When the guy came out to interview, he was really good and helpful, but it was just hard to find someone to help with dad been a little bit bigger and heavier. They like the person that they had come out a couple of times. The caregiver is good.”

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 In-Home Care St Paul Park, MN

How does In-home Senior Care in St Paul Park, MN work?

Home is where the heart is. While that saying can sound a tad cliche, it's especially true for many seniors living in America. When given a choice, older adults most often prefer to grow older at home. An AARP study found that three out of four adults over the age of 50 want to stay in their homes and communities as they age. When you begin to think about why, it makes sense. Home offers a sense of security, comfort, and familiarity.

The truth is, as we age, we begin to rely on others for help. When a family is too busy or lives too far away to fulfill this role, in-home senior care is often the best solution. Home care services allow seniors to enjoy personal independence while also receiving trustworthy assistance from a trained caregiver.

At Always Best Care, we offer a comprehensive range of home care services to help seniors stay healthy while they get the help they need to remain independent. As your senior loved one ages, giving them the gift of senior care is one of the best ways to show your love, even if you live far away.

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 Senior Care St Paul Park, MN

Aging in Place: The Preferred Choice for Most Seniors

While it's true that some seniors have complicated medical needs that prevent them from staying at home, aging in place is often the best arrangement for seniors and their families. With a trusted caregiver, seniors have the opportunity to live with a sense of dignity and do so as they see fit.

In-home care makes it possible for millions of seniors to age in place every year. Rather than moving to a unfamiliar assisted living community, seniors have the chance to stay at home where they feel the happiest and most comfortable.

Here are just a few of the reasons why older men and women prefer to age at home:

Comfort
Comfort

How much does a senior's home truly mean to them? A study published by the American Society on Aging found that more than half of seniors say their home's emotional value means more than how much their home is worth in monetary value. It stands to reason, that a senior's home is where they want to grow old. With the help of elderly care in St Paul Park, MN, seniors don't have to age in a sterilized care facility. Instead, they can age gracefully in the place they want to be most: their home. In contrast, seniors who move to a long-term care facility must adapt to new environments, new people, and new systems that the facility implements. At this stage in life, this kind of drastic change can be more harmful than helpful.

Healthy Living
Healthy Living

Institutional care facilities like nursing homes often put large groups of people together to live in one location. On any given day, dozens of staff members and caregivers run in and out of these facilities. Being around so many new people in a relatively small living environment can be dangerous for a seniors' health and wellbeing. When you consider that thousands of seniors passed away in nursing homes during the COVID-19 pandemic, opting for in-home care is often a safer, healthier choice for seniors. Aging in place has been shown to improve seniors' quality of life, which helps boost physical health and also helps insulate them from viral and bacterial risks found in elderly living facilities.

Independence
Independence

For many seniors, the ability to live independently with assistance from a caregiver is a priceless option. With in-home care, seniors experience a higher level of independence and freedom - much more so than in other settings like an assisted living community. When a senior has the chance to age in place, they get to live life on their own terms, inside the house that they helped make into a home. More independence means more control over their personal lives, too, which leads to increased levels of fulfillment, happiness, and personal gratification. Over time, these positive feelings can manifest into a healthier, longer life.

Cost and Convenience
Cost and Convenience

More independence, a healthier life, and increased comfort are only a few benefits of aging in place. You have to take into consideration the role of cost and convenience. Simply put, it's usually easier to help seniors age in place than it is to move them into an institutional care facility. In-home care services from Always Best Care, for instance, can be less expensive than long-term solutions, which can cost upwards of six figures per year. To make matters worse, many residential care facilities are reluctant to accept long-term care insurance and other types of payment assistance.

With Always Best Care's home care services, seniors and their families have a greater level of control over their care plans. In-home care in St Paul Park, MN gives seniors the chance to form a bond with a trusted caregiver and also receive unmatched care that is catered to their needs. In long-term care facilities, seniors and their loved ones have much less control over their care plan and have less of a say in who provides their care.

Empowers Seniors

Affordable Care Plans

In-home care is a valuable resource that empowers seniors to age in place on their own terms. However, a big concern for many families and their loved ones is how much in-home care costs. If you're worried that in-home care is too expensive, you may be pleasantly surprised to learn that it is one of the most affordable senior care arrangements available.

Typically, hiring an Always Best Care in-home caregiver for a few hours a week is more affordable than sending your loved one to a long-term care facility. This is true even for seniors with more complex care needs.

At Always Best Care, we will work closely with you and your family to develop a Care Plan that not only meets your care needs, but your budget requirements, too. Once we discover the level of care that you or your senior need, we develop an in-home care plan that you can afford.

In addition to our flexible care options, families should also consider the following resources to help offset potential home care costs:

Veteran's Benefits
Veteran's Benefits

Attendance and aid benefits through military service can cover a portion of the costs associated with in-home care for veterans and their spouses.

Long-Term Care Insurance
Long-Term Care Insurance

Many senior care services like in-home care are included in long-term care insurance options. Research different long-term care solutions to find a plan that provides coverage for senior care.

Private Insurance
Private Insurance

Home care can be included as part of a senior's private insurance plan. Read over your loved one's insurance policy carefully or speak with their insurance provider to determine if in-home care is covered.

Life Insurance
Life Insurance

Depending on the life insurance plan, you may be able to apply your policy toward long-term care. You may be able to use long-term-care coverage to help pay for in-home elderly care.


Respite Care St Paul Park, MN

During your Care Plan consultation with Always Best Care, your Care Coordinator will speak with you about in-home care costs and what options there may be to help meet your budget needs.

Compassionate Care. Trusted Caregivers

When you or your senior loved one needs assistance managing daily tasks at home, finding a qualified caregiver can be challenging. It takes a special kind of person to provide reliable care for your senior loved one. However, a caregiver's role involves more than meal preparation and medication reminders. Many seniors rely on their caregivers for companionship, too.

Our companion care services give seniors the chance to socialize in a safe environment and engage in activities at home. These important efforts boost morale and provide much-needed relief from repetitive daily routines. A one-on-one, engaging conversation can sharpen seniors' minds and give them something in which to be excited.

At Always Best Care, we only hire care providers that we would trust to care for our own loved ones. Our senior caregivers in St Paul Park,MN understand how important it is to listen and communicate with their seniors. A seemingly small interaction, like a short hug goodbye, can make a major difference in a senior's day. Instead of battling against feelings of isolation, seniors begin to look forward to seeing their caregiver each week.

Understanding the nuances of senior care is just one of the reasons why our care providers are so great at their job.

Unlike some senior care companies, our caregivers must undergo extensive training before they work for Always Best Care. In addition, our caregivers receive ongoing training throughout the year. This training ensures that their standard of care matches up to the high standards we've come to expect. During this training, they will brush up on their communication skills, safety awareness, and symptom spotting. That way, your loved one receives the highest level of non-medical home care from day one.

 Caregivers St Paul Park, MN

Taking the First Step with Always Best Care

The first step in getting quality in-home care starts with a personal consultation with an experienced Care Coordinator. This initial consultation is crucial for our team to learn more about you or your elderly loved one to discover the level of care required. Topics of this consultation typically include:

An assessment of your senior loved one

01

An in-depth discussion of the needs of your senior loved one to remain in their own home

02

Reviewing a detailed Care Plan that will meet your senior loved one's needs

03

Our caregivers are trained to spot changes that clients exhibit, like mental and physical decline. As your trusted senior care company, we will constantly assess and update your Care Plan to meet any new emotional, intellectual, physical, and emotional needs.

If you have never considered in-home care before, we understand that you and your family may have concerns about your Care Plan and its Care Coordinator. To help give you peace of mind, know that every team member and caregiver must undergo comprehensive training before being assigned to a Care Plan.

When you're ready, we encourage you to contact your local Always Best Care representative to set up a Care Consultation. Our Care Coordinators would be happy to meet with you in person to get to know you better, discuss your needs, and help put together a personalized Care Plan specific to your needs.

Latest News in St Paul Park, MN

'Friendly competition' lands St. Paul, Minneapolis among top 3 parks systems in U.S.

No. 2 St. Paul edged out No. 3 Minneapolis by just .4 points in 2023.ST PAUL, Minn. — Minneapolis and St. Paul have once again finished in the top three of an annual ranking of park systems among the 100 largest American cities.According to the annual ParkScore Index, compiled by the Trust for Public Lands, Washington D.C. finished with the top ranking, followed by St. Paul in second and Minneapolis in third."[Washington D.C.] gets fed...

No. 2 St. Paul edged out No. 3 Minneapolis by just .4 points in 2023.

ST PAUL, Minn. — Minneapolis and St. Paul have once again finished in the top three of an annual ranking of park systems among the 100 largest American cities.

According to the annual ParkScore Index, compiled by the Trust for Public Lands, Washington D.C. finished with the top ranking, followed by St. Paul in second and Minneapolis in third.

"[Washington D.C.] gets federal funding for the National Mall, so I'm just going to say that we operate the number one municipal park system in the country," said St. Paul Mayor Melvin Carter.

St. Paul received a total score of 80.8 out of 100. The rankings were compiled across five categories.

St. Paul Parks Director Andy Rodriguez says access in St. Paul has always been among the best in the nation, with 99 percent of residents within a 10-minute walk of a park. This year, the city saw an additional bump in its amenities score after it added several new dog parks across the city, including one in Lowertown.

He says equity is the newest category and continues to be an area of focus.

"We made youth sports free across the city for ages 10 and up, which eliminates a fee barrier for everybody," he said. "That's an equity initiative."

St. Paul received 71 out of 100 points for equity this year, while Minneapolis earned 59 points. Those scores helped make the difference between second and third place. It was Minneapolis with 80.4 total points, compared to St. Paul's 80.8.

Kent: "Does it feel good to get a little bit of an edge over Minneapolis?"

Rodriguez: "I would say that we work in tandem with one another, we're the Twin Cities right? But there is a friendly rivalry there."

Al Bangoura, Superintendent of the Minneapolis Parks and Recreation Board, would agree.

"There's a little bit of a competition," Bangoura said.

But that's not to say Bangoura is upset. Minneapolis improved from fifth overall in 2022 to third, thanks to new parks like Bridal Veil Gardens in the Prospect Park neighborhood, and its own equity initiatives, which focused on investments in parks in diverse neighborhoods.

"We have all this work that we're putting in to our areas that are really a focus for us, to make sure that we meet those needs of those communities," Bnagoura said. "It just reaffirms the work that we do every day."

Speaking of work, Rodriguez says St. Paul Parks and Recreation is still working on ways to help community members and park staff heal from a shooting outside Oxford Community Center in January.

"The change we implemented, it's been going great," he said. "We've invested a lot of resources and time there — revamped the staffing model and other things. We have a big basketball camp there this Saturday with Tre Holloman, who will be there to work with about 100 kids from the neighborhood."

Whether it's similar camps, summer sports or several newly opened skate parks, Rodriguez says the goal is for healthy competition to build a safer sense of community. That's something both cities can certainly relate to.

Bangoura: "It's exciting because we are the Twin Cities and to be in the top three is really amazing."

Rodriguez: "We complement each other very well, and if you look at it from a regional perspective, the Twin Cities are where it's at."

Bangoura: "Friendly competition is always good, but it pushes us to really be excellent in our park systems and what we deliver to our community."

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Weekend Roundup: Aquatennial, ‘National Guard Family Day,’ new St. Paul park and more

While St. Paul opened up Assembly Union Park and held a block party in the Rondo neighborhood, Minneapolis closed out its four-day Aquatennial celebration this weekend.Around the MetroA new park opened up in St. Paul on Saturday. Assembly Union Park is located in the Highland Bridge neighborhood and covers an acre and a half. It includes three pickleball courts, a basketball court and a playground. This is the third of four new parks constructed at the Highland Bridge development in St. Paul.This is a modal window....

While St. Paul opened up Assembly Union Park and held a block party in the Rondo neighborhood, Minneapolis closed out its four-day Aquatennial celebration this weekend.

Around the Metro

A new park opened up in St. Paul on Saturday. Assembly Union Park is located in the Highland Bridge neighborhood and covers an acre and a half. It includes three pickleball courts, a basketball court and a playground. This is the third of four new parks constructed at the Highland Bridge development in St. Paul.

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Assembly Union Park opens in St. Paul

St. Paul’s Rondo neighborhood was filled with live music, fun and interactive art on Saturday. A block party was held in celebration of the 30th anniversary of the Rondo Community Land Trust. The nonprofit works to develop affordable housing for low to moderate-income households in St. Paul and Ramsey County.

Saturday night saw the four-day Aquatennial festivities in Minneapolis close out with a bang. Festivities were happening all day, with a fireworks show over the Mississippi River serving as the finale to the celebration. The 20-minute show included a soundtrack of artists who have performed in Minneapolis this year.

National Guard members and their families got a special treat on Sunday in Arden Hills. The Minnesota Building and Construction Trades Council hosted a “National Guard Family Day,” which included bounce houses, llamas, a dunk tank and rock climbing. 30 volunteers cooked meals to give back to those who keep us safe and allow soldiers time to spend with their families.

Rosemount’s Leprechaun Days are happening this week, and the Kids Parade was held Sunday at Central Park. Among the events planned for the week include beer gardens, concerts and fireworks.

Dog Fashion was on full display in Minneapolis on Sunday. Bebe Zito’s Hot Dog summer event was held at Malcolm Yards, complete with ice cream and a dog fashion show. It was free to participate, and all dogs got a free cup of Bebe Zito Pup Cream. The theme of the fashion show was “Barbieland”, and a portion of the event’s proceeds benefit All Dog Rescue.

In the Studio

The 29th Annual Artcar Parade kicks off next Saturday, July 29, in Minneapolis. 5 EYEWITNESS NEWS anchor Alex Jokich sat down with Jan Elftmann, the director of the event, to talk about what to expect. The parade kicks off at 5 p.m. at Lake Harriet, with people from across the state working to turn their cars or bikes into mobile masterpieces. The event is free and open to the public.

The fifth annual Taste Fore the Tour fundraiser will take place on Monday at Interlachen Country Club in Edina. 5 EYEWITNESS NEWS anchor Brett Hoffland sat down with Wayne Kostroski, co-founder of Taste Fore The Tour, to find out more about the event. Proceeds from the fundraiser go toward Volunteers Enlisted to Assist People — the largest food pantry in the Twin Cities. The event itself is sold out, but the public can still support VEAP by bidding at the event’s silent auction or making donations online here. Bidding closes Monday at 8:30 p.m.

The Twin Cities Slavic Experience will be back and bigger than ever in St. Louis Park this summer. Aneta Lennartson, founder and executive director of Slavic Experience, joined the studio to talk about the celebration. The upcoming event celebrates Eastern European culture, such as Poland, Ukraine, Serbia and the Czech Republic, with food, music, and art. The Twin Cities Slavic Experience takes place on Aug. 5 and 6 at the West End Festival Site in St. Louis Park.

The Anoka County Fair is back with some big events on the schedule this year. Fair Manager Michaela Liebl spoke with 5 EYEWITNESS NEWS anchor Alex Jokich to preview all of the fun to come. This year will see the first-ever country concert at the grandstand, a monster truck challenge, an interactive farm-to-table experience, live animals and even an Elvis impersonator. The Anoka County Fair takes place from July 25-30.

Here's why the park systems of St. Paul and Minneapolis are the envy of the nation

ST. PAUL, Minn. – From the nightlife to nature, there are so many ways to enjoy a Minnesota summer – like by visiting the world-class parks of the Twin Cities.In fact, a nonprofit organization just named St. Paul and Minneapolis as home to the country's second- and third-best parks. Only Washington D.C. could edge them out.The sound of music is tucked into the cityscape of Rice Park in St. Paul.MORE: ...

ST. PAUL, Minn. – From the nightlife to nature, there are so many ways to enjoy a Minnesota summer – like by visiting the world-class parks of the Twin Cities.

In fact, a nonprofit organization just named St. Paul and Minneapolis as home to the country's second- and third-best parks. Only Washington D.C. could edge them out.

The sound of music is tucked into the cityscape of Rice Park in St. Paul.

MORE: Twin Cities parks ranked among top 3 in nation, but equity remains an issue

"I love the music in the parks, and the flowers, everything about the parks. All ages of people walking around. It is just wonderful," said metro resident Cindy Smedberg.

Why are Twin Cities parks so coveted? It comes down to access, acreage, investment, amenities and equity.

St. Paul Parks and Recreation Director Andy Rodriguez says the cities try to set an example.

"A lot of other park systems look to us as kind of a national model. Between us and Minneapolis, we complement each other very well for the region and nationally," Rodriguez said. "Whether they are coming to visit or to move, the park access piece is huge. We hear a lot from young families about how they covet their park system."

And that is for all residents, hoping to create the best park system that can be spread across all neighborhoods.

"We also want to make sure that the amenities that we have in our system are reflective of all different cultures and community that we see in St. Paul," he said.

MORE: Lineup released for Minneapolis' 2023 Music and Movies in the Parks

Over in Minneapolis, the goals are the same.

"We look across the diversity of our users, and the people that want access to parks, we focus on that," said Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board Superintendent Al Bangoura. "[We] give all these different kind of parks, parklets and smaller ones, larger parks."

Bangoura says it's not about the score, but doing their best for the people.

"We hear from our community what their needs are. And so we make sure that we meet those needs," he said.

ParkScore says virtually all St. Paul and Minneapolis residents live within a 10-minute walk of a park.

Joseph Dames

Joseph Dames joined the WCCO team during the winter of 2022. He is currently the weekend morning meteorologist. You can also catch him putting together weather, science, and other environmental stories during the week.

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ADVISORY: Celebrating 174 Years of Saint Paul Parks and New National Ranking

MEDIA ADVISORY:CONTACT: Michael-jon Pease, Saint Paul Parks [email protected] Carey-Linskey, Saint Paul Parks and Recreation [email protected] CELEBRATING 174 YEARS OF SAINT PAUL PARKS AND NEW NATIONAL RANKINGPublic Celebration to Hono...

MEDIA ADVISORY:

CONTACT: Michael-jon Pease, Saint Paul Parks Conservancy[email protected]651-341-7269

Liz Carey-Linskey, Saint Paul Parks and Recreation [email protected]612-900-5307

CELEBRATING 174 YEARS OF SAINT PAUL PARKS AND NEW NATIONAL RANKING

Public Celebration to Honor Public-Private Partnerships

May 24 at Rice Park

The Saint Paul Parks Conservancy and Saint Paul Parks and Recreation will host the 174th birthday of Saint Paul Parks and celebrate Saint Paul’s soon to be announced national ranking as a top urban park system on Trust for Public Land’s annual ParkScore Index, which will be released on May 24. The event – complete with live music and birthday cake – will be held on Wednesday, May 24 from 4:00 – 5:00 p.m. in Rice Park downtown. Rice and Irvine Parks were platted in May 1849, making them the oldest of the City’s 182 parks.

Saint Paul parks have always benefitted from private support, from early land donations to the 5,000 volunteers and donors who keep the system shining. In that spirit, Mayor Melvin Carter will accept a donation from Jace Fellon on behalf of local scouts, whose winter fundraiser proceeds will help renovate local playgrounds. MN United FC will also be announcing its contribution for the continued improvement of Midway Peace Park.

WHAT: Saint Park Parks Birthday Party

WHEN: Wednesday, May 24, 4:00 – 5:00 p.m.

WHERE: Rice Park, 109 W 4th St, St Paul, MN 55102

INFO: saintpaulparksconservancy.org

About the Saint Paul Parks Conservancy – The Saint Paul Parks Conservancy partners with community to make St. Paul parks better – to grow them, to improve the equipment and facilities, to deepen visitors' appreciation of the land and its history. The Conservancy has raised more than $3 million for St. Paul parks.

Here are just a few projects the Conservancy is working on right now:

The Conservancy does this through fundraisers and donations. The group’s annual Party For The Parks fundraiser is June 21, 2023 at 5:30 p.m. in Phalen Park.

About Saint Paul Parks and Recreation Saint Paul Parks and Recreation is a nationally accredited and gold medal award-winning organization that manages 183 parks and open spaces, AZA-accredited Como Park Zoo and Conservatory, 26 city-operated recreation centers, more than 120 miles of trails, an indoor and two outdoor aquatic facilities, a public beach, a variety of premium sports facilities, municipal golf courses, and Great River Passage – which is the new identity for all proposed public development along Saint Paul’s more than 17 miles of Mississippi riverfront. For more information about Saint Paul Parks and Recreation, visit www.stpaul.gov/parks.

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Last Edited: June 7, 2023

Olympic champion Suni Lee honored with surprise sculpture in St. Paul park

Suni Lee stared in awe at the sculpture unveiled on a sunny Sunday morning at Phalen Regional Park — a bronze bust of the St. Paul native that overlooks Lake Phalen.The Hmong American Olympic champion said she was grateful to have inspired a community she's proud to be a part of."I wouldn't be here without you guys truly, selling the T-shirts and coming to fundraisers and helping everything even when my family was at my lowest," Lee said.The unveiling, which was a surprise to Lee and her parents, took pla...

Suni Lee stared in awe at the sculpture unveiled on a sunny Sunday morning at Phalen Regional Park — a bronze bust of the St. Paul native that overlooks Lake Phalen.

The Hmong American Olympic champion said she was grateful to have inspired a community she's proud to be a part of.

"I wouldn't be here without you guys truly, selling the T-shirts and coming to fundraisers and helping everything even when my family was at my lowest," Lee said.

The unveiling, which was a surprise to Lee and her parents, took place as part of "Sunisa Lee Day" in Minnesota to honor her achievements and character. About 100 people attended the ceremony, including St. Paul Mayor Melvin Carter, Lt. Gov. Peggy Flanagan and City Council members.

Blake School art teacher Seexeng Lee, who sculpted the bust, said he was inspired by Suni Lee's impact as a Hmong woman and wanted the sculpture to promote the Hmong community. He worked with St. Paul Parks and Recreation to complete the project and obtained a family photo from her parents as a reference for the work.

Suni Lee won three medals at the Tokyo Olympics in 2021 — gold in the all-around, silver in the team competition and a bronze in the uneven bars — after becoming the first Hmong American gymnast to qualify for the Olympics.

The sculpture was completed in three weeks and cost $33,000. St. Paul City Council Member Nelsie Yang obtained $15,000 from neighborhood STAR funds, and Seexeng Lee came up with the remaining $18,000, St. Paul Parks Director Andy Rodriguez said. Seexeng Lee said he solicited donations on Facebook and from businesses and put up some of his own money.

Suni Lee is only the second female athlete to be recognized within the St. Paul park system, Rodriguez said. A ball field at the Dunning Sports Complex is named for Toni Stone, who grew up in St. Paul and became the first woman to play on a majors-level professional baseball team.

"Not only will this new piece of art honor Suni and all that she has accomplished, but it will also help inspire the next generation of St. Paul's young people to pursue their dreams," Rodriguez said.

Not only did Suni Lee dazzle the St. Paul community on the electronic screens, Flanagan said, she also showed resilience in facing other challenges — like competing at empty venues during the height of COVID-19 and helping her family when her father was paralyzed in 2021.

Carter said he saw Lee's character when she returned to the Twin Cities after the Olympics. When crowds gathered at Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport to welcome her home, she took the time to sign autographs and take pictures with the children who came to greet her.

"The most incredible thing that happened that day is that our champion, who had just been on an international flight and just returned from the Olympics, who had the weight of the world and the eyes of the world on her, was the last person to leave the airport," the mayor said.

Lee is currently training for the 2024 Olympics. The 2024 U.S. Olympic Team Trials will be held at Target Center in Minneapolis next June.

Seexeng Lee's daughter Nadia Lee, 21, said she was excited to watch Lee compete again and see how she continues to represent the Hmong community.

"I love that she represents our success and our ability for excellence and to be at the top," Nadia Lee said.

Staff writer Laura Yuen contributed to this report.

Correction: This story has been updated to give the correct name of the lake the sculpture overlooks.

Two Minnesota cities are ranked second and third on annual list of nation's best parks

Minneapolis and St. Paul are neck-and-neck when it comes to having the top park systems in the country according to the latest rankings released by Trust for Public Land.For a third straight year, Washington D.C. sits atop the ParkScore rankings with an 84.9 out of 100 rating.St. Paul was second on the list for the second straight year, scoring 80.8 while Minneapolis moved up two spots from last year's fifth-place ranking to third scoring an 80.4....

Minneapolis and St. Paul are neck-and-neck when it comes to having the top park systems in the country according to the latest rankings released by Trust for Public Land.

For a third straight year, Washington D.C. sits atop the ParkScore rankings with an 84.9 out of 100 rating.

St. Paul was second on the list for the second straight year, scoring 80.8 while Minneapolis moved up two spots from last year's fifth-place ranking to third scoring an 80.4.

1. Washington D.C. (84.9)2. St. Paul (80.8)3. Minneapolis (80.4)4. Irvine, CA (80.0)5. Arlington, VA (78.9)6. Cincinnati, OH (76.9)7. San Francisco, CA (76.4)8. Seattle, WA (74.7)9. Portland, OR (73.7)T10. New York, NY (72.7)T10. Boston, MA (72.7)

#2 St. Paul

The ParkScore scores five different categories including accessibility, acreage, investment, amenities, and equity.

St. Paul parks scored a 99 in the accessibility category with 99 percent of the city's residents living within a walkable half-mile of a park. St. Paul scored a 100 on investment with the city spending $246 per capita each year on publicly accessible parks and recreation, among the highest for this category.

The lowest scores came from the equity (71) and acreage (51) categories.

While St. Paul scores 100 out of 100 points for people of color living within a 10-minute walk of a park and 100 points for low-income households, St. Paul, residents living in neighborhoods of color have access to 32% less nearby park space than those living in white neighborhoods.

Lower-income neighborhoods have access to 34% less nearby park space than those in higher income neighborhoods.

Related

#3 Minneapolis

Minneapolis' scored highest in the investment category receiving 100 out of 100 points spending a total of $312 per capita is spent each year on publicly accessible parks and recreation. Accessibility also was a high scoring area for Minneapolis parks, 98 percent of the city's population living within a walkable half-mile of a park.

Minneapolis saw its lowest score when it came to park equity (59 out of 100).

According to the rankings, residents living in neighborhoods of color have access to 59% less nearby park space than those living in white neighborhoods.

Residents living in lower-income neighborhoods have access to 65% less nearby park space than those in higher income neighborhoods.

Minneapolis scored 83 out of 100 points for park amenities and 62 out of 100 points for acreage.

Other notable park rankings

13. Madison, WI20. Milwaukee, WI50. Oakland, CA80. Los Angeles, CA100. Gilbert, AZ

Featured Image Photo Credit: Getty

St. Paul’s struggling Park Square Theatre cancels final three shows of the season

St. Paul’s Park Square Theatre has canceled the final three productions of its current season in a bid to save the struggling company.“After more than two years of managing fiscally difficult circumstances, including the pandemic, the leadership of the Park Square Theatre has adopted a new strategic plan to address both immediate fiscal matters and develop a stronger vision for long-term success,” read a press release from Park Square.The canceled productions include “Between Riverside and Crazy” (...

St. Paul’s Park Square Theatre has canceled the final three productions of its current season in a bid to save the struggling company.

“After more than two years of managing fiscally difficult circumstances, including the pandemic, the leadership of the Park Square Theatre has adopted a new strategic plan to address both immediate fiscal matters and develop a stronger vision for long-term success,” read a press release from Park Square.

The canceled productions include “Between Riverside and Crazy” (May 24-June 18), “Fools and Lovers” (June 7-July 2) and “Holmes/Poirot” (July 19-Aug. 20). Ticketholders will be contacted next week. A note on Park Square’s website urges those with seats to donate the tickets back to the theater and that “we aspire to provide refunds to those requesting them, but note that we are not in a position to issue refunds immediately.”

In December, the company announced it was canceling its first two shows of 2023 — “The Diary of Anne Frank” and “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” — due to slow ticket sales.

Park Square’s current show “The Revolutionists” will continue its run and serve as the company’s final production of the 2022-23 season. SteppingStone Creative Learning camps and classes, including spring classes and summer camps, will continue as scheduled as will planned facility rentals with other production companies.

Park Square started in 1975 with 70 seats and has grown to a multi-stage, 550-seat professional theater. In August 2020, Park Square and SteppingStone Theatre for Youth announced they were becoming partners due to pre-pandemic debt issues. SteppingStone later moved into Park Square’s home in the historic Hamm Building.

“If there had been any viable way to continue with the season as announced, we would have done it,” reads a note on Park Square’s website. “Our challenge is to both address our current challenges as well as create the best plan for the theater’s future.”

The board is working with Park Square’s new interim executive director Rachel Murch-D’Olimpio on a new strategic plan and budget, with a focus on fundraising. Murch-D’Olimpio previously worked as the general manager of the Ordway Center for the Performing Arts’ Broadway series.

St. Paul floats three conceptual designs for Pedro Park before upcoming annex demolition

Following years of litigation and debate, the demolition of the long-vacant public safety annex building at 10th and Robert streets in downtown St. Paul has finally been put out to bid by the city.Its removal this spring could make room for a new park running at least two-thirds the length of the block, though city officials acknowledge that funding sources for the future Pedro Park remain undefined....

Following years of litigation and debate, the demolition of the long-vacant public safety annex building at 10th and Robert streets in downtown St. Paul has finally been put out to bid by the city.

Its removal this spring could make room for a new park running at least two-thirds the length of the block, though city officials acknowledge that funding sources for the future Pedro Park remain undefined.

Nevertheless, officials with St. Paul Parks and Recreation and Aune Fernandez Landscape Architects unveiled three concept plans this week intended to guide the long-term development of Pedro Park, which would largely occupy the space where the five-story Pedro Luggage and Briefcase Center once stood.

The city last year identified some $500,000 to demolish the four-story public safety annex building, which likely would unfold between this March and May. Working with a citizens group, Parks and Rec went back to the drawing board and assembled three new concept plans for Pedro Park, each one nearly twice the size of the 2018 plan.

“They all look really good,” said downtown resident Josiah Hakala, after reviewing plans on Monday and finding his eye drawn toward a potential water feature at 10th and Robert streets, as well as a diagonal walking path. “I kind of like the overall aesthetic of Concept B — it activates the northeast corner better than the other ones.”

The three plans, presented for public feedback Monday at an open house on Wabasha Street, each span about two-thirds of the block. The space is bounded by the Union Gospel Mission Child Development Center at Ninth and Robert streets, as well as a strip of privately-owned parking that runs along Minnesota Street. Following demolition of the public safety annex building this spring, the city would seek to install some interim improvements, which have yet to be finalized but could include lighting and security elements, short sections of walkway, some green space, trees and turf or bee lawn.

The three concept plans

In the long term, each concept plan envisions maintaining the lower portions of the public safety annex building as retaining walls and filling in the existing recessed park space to create a gentler, graded slope that still drops at least three feet below 10th Street. To varying degrees, each plan also includes a water feature, a covered but otherwise non-enclosed shelter, central greenspace, public art, a bee lawn, table seating, a children’s play area and a sizable dog run.

Concept A: Original plan, but larger, with a prominent water feature

Concept A extends plans unveiled in 2018 further south toward Minnesota Street but otherwise keeps the same general themes in a larger envelope.

An entrance off 10th Street would allow access to a streetscape shelter — the largest shelter in the three designs — featuring an interior water feature, as well as steps that lead down to a larger outdoor fountain or splash pad, the most prominent water feature in the three concept plans. The park would be situated in a rectangular layout, with the less formal amenities — such as the children’s play area and dog run — situated toward the farthest ends as visitors progress into the park, creating something of a backyard feel at its lower edges.

Concept B: Diagonal pass-through

Concept B features a diagonal pass-through, or curved walkway arcing around the wedge-shaped green from 10th and Minnesota streets to a point halfway down the block along Robert Street. A shelter, smaller than the one in Concept A, would be tucked away toward Minnesota Street, and the fountain or splash pad water feature would be moved up toward the corner of 10th and Robert. Preliminary designs envision potential space for pocket gardens and a pickleball court, as well as larger space than in Concept A for the children’s play area and dog run.

Concept C: Ellipse

Concept C creates an ellipse, or rounded, football-shaped park with amenities squaring off the corners. A large shelter similar to that in Concept A would be situated along 10th Street to bolster the streetscape, with a long arbor opposite the shelter to provide shade at the southern edge of the park. In addition to the northwest-southeast link between the shelter and arbor, a stairway along Robert Street would be designed to pull people into the park from both directions. Public art would gain special prominence at the corner of 10th and Robert streets, and the children’s area and pet play areas would be located in the same area as in Concept A but run larger in size. A pickleball court could be introduced along 10th Street.

Open house

On Monday, downtown residents visiting the open house in the Osborn 370 building at 370 Wabasha St. seemed to gravitate mostly toward Concept B, which offers the clearest path from Minnesota to Robert streets without disrupting turf or park activities.

“It will become more natural in terms of where people are walking,” said Kathleen O’Neill, a resident of the Penfield, debating the pros and cons of each option while studying posterboard displays.

“It’s an interesting shape,” added Julie Prince, a downtown resident who chaired the most recent working group dedicated to park planning.

History

The Pedro family donated its luggage store to the city in 2009 with the expectation that the city would build a two-acre park, or something close to that, within five years. The building was demolished in 2011, but little more than a temporary garden has ever been planted on the recessed lot.

Neighborhood efforts to force the city to tear down the adjoining 1920s-era public safety annex building seemed to falter in 2018 when the St. Paul City Council voted 5-2 to allow a Minneapolis developer — the Ackerberg Group — to redevelop the structure for office uses. The building sale would have helped fund a $4 million, quarter-block park, but opponents were quick to label the scaled-down plans for Pedro Park akin to a future office lawn.

Then “the former plans for the park fell apart,” Prince said.

Neighborhood residents took their battle to court and lost, but by the time their efforts to block the building sale to Ackerberg fell short before the Minnesota Court of Appeals, the developer had already pulled out of the project, blaming the pandemic-driven downturn in office rentals. With an eye toward a larger Pedro Park, the St. Paul City Council authorized demolition funds for the public safety annex building last October.

The current project website can be found at: https://www.stpaul.gov/departments/parks-and-recreation/design-construction/current-projects/pedro-park

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