AA Learn more about in-home care options for your loved ones

Given the choice, most of us want to stay in our homes. Sometimes, people need help to remain at home. That's where Always Best Care Senior Services comes in.

Personal Care Consultation

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TESTIMONIALS

“Thank you so much for your kind , personalized service. My mother was always resistant to have someone come into her home to help care for her, but she is very, very pleased with Betsy. Not only does she have someone to keep her company and meet her physical needs—her kitchen is looking cleaner than I have seen it in a while. Thank you again. Your kind manner was reassuring to my mother and to me, and you have made the process of caring for my mother at home easy, and provided me with much needed relief so that I can actually return to work with a calm mind.”

Varner M.
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TESTIMONIALS

“Excellent company, very experienced management and staffs. Highly recommend”

Fiona S.
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TESTIMONIALS

“I just wanted express our thoughts about Mary, who was the caregiver for the weekend. We all thought she was wonderful!! I think her biggest strength is that she sees the work, needs little/to no direction, offers to take things out of our hands, and is a true-go-getter. For Billie, this type of help is great since she feels like she can take some time to rest and trust all is okay. Mary works hard and is also very patient. I really think Mary is a natural dealing with elderly. She is patient and kind! Anyway, what I wanted to ask is if Mary can be the consistent caregiver for the weekends. The other 4 caregivers that I have met are also very nice. We would like Mary as much as possible as she is punctual, and as I mentioned before, sees what needs doing. She is focused on what she can do to help. She doesnt just sit there next to Bill, she has eyes in the back of her head and goes the extra mile. Anything that needs to get done, she says no wait, let me do it if she hasnt already initiated it herself. She seems to have endless energy and never complained. I just felt compelled to drop you a this note to let you know how impressed we were with her. Thanks”

Petra D.
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TESTIMONIALS

“Always Best Care Services is a good place to get good care. The employees would do their very best to take care of you in your time of need. I will recommended this facility to family and friends. I want to thank you so much for the exceptional care you took of my dad. I hold your agency in the highest regard and you have my deepest appreciation.”

Jaymie B.
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TESTIMONIALS

“My mother was in need of help after she broke her hip at 101 years old. She refused to leave her home. Susan Oderwald took wonderful care of her. She found caregivers for her who treated her with kid gloves and she herself went above and beyond by getting papers signed, visiting her in the hospital and fetching things for her. I don't know what I would have done without her, since I live 3,000 miles away. I highly recommend her, her services and her staff of caregivers.”

Susan A.
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TESTIMONIALS

“We would like to express our appreciation and thanks for the in-home care that Always Best Care is providing our parents. You have guided us through this very difficult time and have helped us deal with my mother’s illness and her inability to care for my dad. Your caregivers are very capable and caring, and your staff is competent and thorough. We believe this makes your company invaluable to families with loved ones in need of assistance. We would recommend Always Best Care to anybody in search of quality care for their loved one. Thank you for all you and your staff do.”

Hunter L.
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TESTIMONIALS

“We would like to express our appreciation and thanks for the in-home care that Always Best Care is providing our parents. You have guided us through this very difficult time and have helped us deal with my mother’s illness and her inability to care for my dad. Your caregivers are very capable and caring, and your staff is competent and thorough. We believe this makes your company invaluable to families with loved ones in need of assistance. We would recommend Always Best Care to anybody in search of quality care for their loved one. Thank you for all you and your staff do.”

Fiona H.
 In-Home Care Southport, CT

How does In-home Senior Care in Southport, CT work?

Home is where the heart is. While that saying can sound a tad cliche, it's especially true for many seniors living in America. When given a choice, older adults most often prefer to grow older at home. An AARP study found that three out of four adults over the age of 50 want to stay in their homes and communities as they age. When you begin to think about why, it makes sense. Home offers a sense of security, comfort, and familiarity.

The truth is, as we age, we begin to rely on others for help. When a family is too busy or lives too far away to fulfill this role, in-home senior care is often the best solution. Home care services allow seniors to enjoy personal independence while also receiving trustworthy assistance from a trained caregiver.

At Always Best Care, we offer a comprehensive range of home care services to help seniors stay healthy while they get the help they need to remain independent. As your senior loved one ages, giving them the gift of senior care is one of the best ways to show your love, even if you live far away.

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 Senior Care Southport, CT

Aging in Place: The Preferred Choice for Most Seniors

While it's true that some seniors have complicated medical needs that prevent them from staying at home, aging in place is often the best arrangement for seniors and their families. With a trusted caregiver, seniors have the opportunity to live with a sense of dignity and do so as they see fit.

In-home care makes it possible for millions of seniors to age in place every year. Rather than moving to a unfamiliar assisted living community, seniors have the chance to stay at home where they feel the happiest and most comfortable.

Here are just a few of the reasons why older men and women prefer to age at home:

Comfort
Comfort

How much does a senior's home truly mean to them? A study published by the American Society on Aging found that more than half of seniors say their home's emotional value means more than how much their home is worth in monetary value. It stands to reason, that a senior's home is where they want to grow old. With the help of elderly care in Southport, CT, seniors don't have to age in a sterilized care facility. Instead, they can age gracefully in the place they want to be most: their home. In contrast, seniors who move to a long-term care facility must adapt to new environments, new people, and new systems that the facility implements. At this stage in life, this kind of drastic change can be more harmful than helpful.

Healthy Living
Healthy Living

Institutional care facilities like nursing homes often put large groups of people together to live in one location. On any given day, dozens of staff members and caregivers run in and out of these facilities. Being around so many new people in a relatively small living environment can be dangerous for a seniors' health and wellbeing. When you consider that thousands of seniors passed away in nursing homes during the COVID-19 pandemic, opting for in-home care is often a safer, healthier choice for seniors. Aging in place has been shown to improve seniors' quality of life, which helps boost physical health and also helps insulate them from viral and bacterial risks found in elderly living facilities.

Independence
Independence

For many seniors, the ability to live independently with assistance from a caregiver is a priceless option. With in-home care, seniors experience a higher level of independence and freedom - much more so than in other settings like an assisted living community. When a senior has the chance to age in place, they get to live life on their own terms, inside the house that they helped make into a home. More independence means more control over their personal lives, too, which leads to increased levels of fulfillment, happiness, and personal gratification. Over time, these positive feelings can manifest into a healthier, longer life.

Cost and Convenience
Cost and Convenience

More independence, a healthier life, and increased comfort are only a few benefits of aging in place. You have to take into consideration the role of cost and convenience. Simply put, it's usually easier to help seniors age in place than it is to move them into an institutional care facility. In-home care services from Always Best Care, for instance, can be less expensive than long-term solutions, which can cost upwards of six figures per year. To make matters worse, many residential care facilities are reluctant to accept long-term care insurance and other types of payment assistance.

With Always Best Care's home care services, seniors and their families have a greater level of control over their care plans. In-home care in Southport, CT gives seniors the chance to form a bond with a trusted caregiver and also receive unmatched care that is catered to their needs. In long-term care facilities, seniors and their loved ones have much less control over their care plan and have less of a say in who provides their care.

Empowers Seniors

Affordable Care Plans

In-home care is a valuable resource that empowers seniors to age in place on their own terms. However, a big concern for many families and their loved ones is how much in-home care costs. If you're worried that in-home care is too expensive, you may be pleasantly surprised to learn that it is one of the most affordable senior care arrangements available.

Typically, hiring an Always Best Care in-home caregiver for a few hours a week is more affordable than sending your loved one to a long-term care facility. This is true even for seniors with more complex care needs.

At Always Best Care, we will work closely with you and your family to develop a Care Plan that not only meets your care needs, but your budget requirements, too. Once we discover the level of care that you or your senior need, we develop an in-home care plan that you can afford.

In addition to our flexible care options, families should also consider the following resources to help offset potential home care costs:

Veteran's Benefits
Veteran's Benefits

Aid and Attendance benefits through military service can cover a portion of the costs associated with in-home care for veterans and their spouses.

Long-Term Care Insurance
Long-Term Care Insurance

Many senior care services like in-home care are included in long-term care insurance options. Research different long-term care solutions to find a plan that provides coverage for senior care.

Private Insurance
Private Insurance

Home care can be included as part of a senior's private insurance plan. Read over your loved one's insurance policy carefully or speak with their insurance provider to determine if in-home care is covered.

Life Insurance
Life Insurance

Depending on the life insurance plan, you may be able to apply your policy toward long-term care. You may be able to use long-term-care coverage to help pay for in-home elderly care.


Respite Care Southport, CT

During your Care Plan consultation with Always Best Care, your Care Coordinator will speak with you about in-home care costs and what options there may be to help meet your budget needs.

Compassionate Care. Trusted Caregivers

When you or your senior loved one needs assistance managing daily tasks at home, finding a qualified caregiver can be challenging. It takes a special kind of person to provide reliable care for your senior loved one. However, a caregiver's role involves more than meal preparation and medication reminders. Many seniors rely on their caregivers for companionship, too.

Our companion care services give seniors the chance to socialize in a safe environment and engage in activities at home. These important efforts boost morale and provide much-needed relief from repetitive daily routines. A one-on-one, engaging conversation can sharpen seniors' minds and give them something in which to be excited.

At Always Best Care, we only hire care providers that we would trust to care for our own loved ones. Our senior caregivers in Southport,CT understand how important it is to listen and communicate with their seniors. A seemingly small interaction, like a short hug goodbye, can make a major difference in a senior's day. Instead of battling against feelings of isolation, seniors begin to look forward to seeing their caregiver each week.

Understanding the nuances of senior care is just one of the reasons why our care providers are so great at their job.

Unlike some senior care companies, our caregivers must undergo extensive training before they work for Always Best Care. In addition, our caregivers receive ongoing training throughout the year. This training ensures that their standard of care matches up to the high standards we've come to expect. During this training, they will brush up on their communication skills, safety awareness, and symptom spotting. That way, your loved one receives the highest level of non-medical home care from day one.

 Caregivers Southport, CT

Taking the First Step with Always Best Care

The first step in getting quality in-home care starts with a personal consultation with an experienced Care Coordinator. This initial consultation is crucial for our team to learn more about you or your elderly loved one to discover the level of care required. Topics of this consultation typically include:

An assessment of your senior loved one

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An in-depth discussion of the needs of your senior loved one to remain in their own home

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Reviewing a detailed Care Plan that will meet your senior loved one's needs

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Our caregivers are trained to spot changes that clients exhibit, like mental and physical decline. As your trusted senior care company, we will constantly assess and update your Care Plan to meet any new emotional, intellectual, physical, and emotional needs.

If you have never considered in-home care before, we understand that you and your family may have concerns about your Care Plan and its Care Coordinator. To help give you peace of mind, know that every team member and caregiver must undergo comprehensive training before being assigned to a Care Plan.

When you're ready, we encourage you to contact your local Always Best Care representative to set up a Care Consultation. Our Care Coordinators would be happy to meet with you in person to get to know you better, discuss your needs, and help put together a personalized Care Plan specific to your needs.

Latest News in Southport, CT

Southport sanctuary seeks help to care for rescued animals

This is a carousel. Use Next and Previous buttons to navigateSOUTHPORT — Goldilocks Farm Sanctuary is looking for donations to keep their rescued animals fed and healthy throughout the year.Jodie O'Brien-Fisher is the owner of the nonprofit sanctuary. She said they take in animals that need homes, such as ones that have been abused or neglected, and rehabilitate them with love, kin...

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SOUTHPORT — Goldilocks Farm Sanctuary is looking for donations to keep their rescued animals fed and healthy throughout the year.

Jodie O'Brien-Fisher is the owner of the nonprofit sanctuary. She said they take in animals that need homes, such as ones that have been abused or neglected, and rehabilitate them with love, kindness and medical care.

Currently, her sanctuary has mini horses, ponies, alpacas, a goat, sheep, chickens and rabbits.

"Everything that we make during the summer, we have to try to put some of that aside for the winter, but that never happens because there's vet bills or farrier bills," Fisher said.

Fisher said people are allowed to visit and play with the animals at the farm, and she also offers parties off-property, including for children and the elderly.

She said they are busy with parties now, but during the winter, it becomes difficult to keep going.

There isn't a specific goal of what to raise, Fisher said, but she wants enough to be comfortable without having to worry. She said this year, she didn't know her personal horse was sick and it got worse when she took it in from a rescue, amassing a vet bill that was almost $10,000.

Fisher said she used to offer adoptions for small, domesticated animals, but now the sanctuary is mainly farm animals and she keeps all of them.

"I've always loved animals since I was a kid," Fisher said. She's had horses for about 35 years.

During COVID-19, she saw a Facebook post about someone wanting to visit horses. Fisher invited them to her house, where she had her own horses, and it eventually grew, and people started making donations.

As the donations grew, Fisher was able to take in more animals.

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Fisher said people would contact her through her website and Facebook to take in animals, though she cannot currently take in more due to space and funds.

She said it has been amazing to rehabilitate animals.

"Having a horse come in that you can't even touch or go near that tries to rear up and strike at you, and six months, eight months later, that pony is your best pony... that's the most amazing feeling or sense of accomplishment," Fisher said.

Fisher said she loves working with kids and the elderly, too.

She said people can donate through goldilocksfarmsanctuary.com, where they can make one time or monthly donations, as well as sponsor an animal. If people are interested in booking for visits or parties, they can also find that on the website.

The donations will help feed the animals and provide medical care. Horses, for example, need their hooves trimmed every six weeks, vaccinations twice a year and their teeth done once a year.

Fisher added that the cost of food is expensive, such as hay, which is now $15 per bail. They go through about two bails a day.

"The animals are not disposable," she said. "If I can just influence even one kid to do what I do one day, that would make everything worth while. That one kid could save one animal, or they could save 500 animals."

Fairfield plans Southport Harbor dredging in early 2024

This is a carousel. Use Next and Previous buttons to navigateFAIRFIELD — Plans to dredge Southport Harbor have resumed with the recent announcement that federal funding is available to remove sandy sediment building up on the eastern shore at the entrance to the harbor.It comes after several years of the town and boaters raising concerns about boating safety due to how much the channel has shrunk."While the dredging planning and envi...

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FAIRFIELD — Plans to dredge Southport Harbor have resumed with the recent announcement that federal funding is available to remove sandy sediment building up on the eastern shore at the entrance to the harbor.

It comes after several years of the town and boaters raising concerns about boating safety due to how much the channel has shrunk.

"While the dredging planning and environmental approval process takes longer than all of us would like, the result will ultimately be a safe, navigable Southport Harbor achieved in an ecologically balanced manner," First Selectwoman Brenda Kupchick said. "That's something all of us will be able to enjoy whether we're on the water or along the shoreline of this exquisite town treasure."

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More than 200 sail and power boats are docked, moored or stored in Southport Harbor with dozens of additional boats entering and exiting the harbor each week using the boat launch ramp at Ye Yacht Yard marina at the end of Harbor Road, according to the Fairfield Harbor Management Commission.

“We know unfortunately that many of these people have to be concerned about running aground in the harbor where at low tide the channel has narrowed from 100 feet to less than 50 feet and, in some places, only five feet of depth can be found,” said Kim Taylor, the commission's chair.

But the channel may soon return to its original 100-foot width and nine-foot depth with the dredging expected to begin around January 2024, the Army Corps of Engineers, which is in charge of the work, told town officials at a meeting in November.

"Dredging has been on the HMC's agenda for at least seven years and probably since the town's efforts to recover from superstorm Sandy in 2012," said Don Hyman, a commissioner on the Fairfield Harbor Management Commission.

A lack of federal funds had delayed maintenance dredging at the harbor in recent years, but the Army Corps of Engineers told the commission in early January the project will get funding through the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act of 2022, according to a release from the commission.

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The project is expected to cost more than $1 million, covered by federal funds, though the exact price is not available yet, Hyman said.

Another delay was that the Army Corps of Engineers' hopper dredge, the dredging vessel needed for this project, is in high demand throughout the East Coast, said Bryan LeClerc, the Southport harbor master appointed by Gov. Ned Lamont.

“The dredging process is inherently complex and lengthy," said Geoffrey Steadman, a consultant for the commission. "It includes many regulatory and funding hurdles and has been that way for years. We’re all committed to maintaining safe and efficient navigation and to do so in an environmentally sound way that will make use of the sandy dredged material for beneficial purposes."

The state Department of Energy and Environmental Protection is also involved and must review and approve the plans to manage the sand dredged from the harbor before it can proceed. The timeline for the final DEEP review is unknown, Taylor said.

The current plan is to place the dredged sand at a designated area offshore to improve shellfish habitat. It was created in consultation with the state Bureau of Aquaculture and Fairfield Shellfish Commission, Steadman said.

Fairfield faced backlash from the Ash Creek Conservation Association when it put the sand from the Fairfield Marina dredging on Jennings Beach instead of on the sand spit at Ash Creek. Fairfield, the group and Bridgeport have since come together to create a plan to protect the sand spit.

The Southport dredging has also posed an environmental concern.

Early in the planning process, there were concerns raised that the dredging would negatively impact the habitat for piping plovers, a protected species, that had been observed in small numbers on the sandy bank along the eastern side of the channel. The Connecticut Audubon Society conducted studies for the commission though and found that the piping plovers have not nested there for more than a decade and the habitat was not attractive for them.

Dredging is nothing new for Southport Harbor. The Army Corps of Engineers last did it in 2004-05. The Fairfield Department of Public Works later excavated sand from the shoal near the entrance in 2014-15, placing the sediment at the town beaches.

"Winds and tides have long deposited sand and sediment to the channel area, hampering both commercial and recreational navigation since the early 19th century and before," Hyman said.

Records show that maintaining the harbor’s navigation channel has historically been difficult and a matter of community concern since the U.S. Congress authorized the jetty in 1829 to slow the westerly drift of sand into the commercially vital Southport Harbor shipping channel, according to the harbor management commission.

"According to an 1838 Army Corps of Engineers report, teams of oxen hauling road scrapers entered two-foot-deep harbor water at low tide to help keep the channel navigable for various size commercial vessels carrying cargoes of onions, other produce and manufactured goods to market," the commission said in a news release.

Information about the harbor and the dredging project is available at fairfieldct.org/hmc.

Southport's Pequot Library Hosts Adult & Children's Programs In June

Among the events is the Southport Garden Stroll fundraiser on June 2.|Updated Fri, May 26, 2023 at 1:22 pm ETThe following two releases are from Pequot Library:FAIRFIELD, CT — Pequot Library kicks off the summer with a slew of exciting programs for adults, all of which are free with the exception of the Southport Garden Stroll fundraiser on June 2. This fundraiser raised $50,000 and drew 800 participants last year. In addition, t...

Among the events is the Southport Garden Stroll fundraiser on June 2.

|Updated Fri, May 26, 2023 at 1:22 pm ET

The following two releases are from Pequot Library:

FAIRFIELD, CT — Pequot Library kicks off the summer with a slew of exciting programs for adults, all of which are free with the exception of the Southport Garden Stroll fundraiser on June 2. This fundraiser raised $50,000 and drew 800 participants last year. In addition, the library unveils its newest exhibition–The Book Beautiful: Selections from the Private Press Movement–with an Opening Reception on June 22 at 6:00 p.m. The library also launches its new three-part Under the Arches Summer Music Series on June 30 at 6:00 p.m. with the well-regarded Horszowski Trio.

The Southport Garden Stroll starts with a June 1 (6:00 p.m.) Champagne & Canapé Kickoff sponsored by TV host, realtor, author and Mar Jennings and held at a private harborside home. Join Marisa Marcantonio, a creative strategist whose work focuses on transforming luxury home brands and the author of a widely read design blog, Stylebeat. A resident of Southport, she will discuss what makes this part of Connecticut well-suited for beautiful interiors and landscaping.

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The library is holding a docent informational session on June 20 at 10:30 a.m. Join staff members and current volunteers to learn more about the variety of volunteer options available. Docents will be trained in how to lead tours of the history of the library building, gain skills in how to lead interactive tours for K-12 school group students, as well as the history of Southport village. Contact Adult Programs Manager Charlie McMahon via email at [email protected] for more information.

The Book Beautiful: Selections from the Private Press Movement exhibition opens on June 22, at 6:00 p.m. The Private Press Movement was an offshoot of the Arts and Crafts Movement and flourished around the turn of the 19th century. Led by William Morris, its adherents rejected modern, mechanized book production in favor of exquisitely crafted texts and bindings produced using traditional techniques. The Book Beautiful explores this rich period in book design, highlighting fine examples from Pequot Library’s Special Collections. The opening reception runs from 6:00 – 8:00 p.m., with a gallery tour led by Special Collections Librarian Cecily Dyer at 6:30 p.m.

Related to the new exhibition, on June 24 at 2:00 p.m., the library hosts a program called The BookBeautiful Today: The Resilience of Traditional Book and Letter Arts. This conversation with Jerry Kelly and Jesse Marsolais focuses on why traditional bookmaking practices continue to flourish, and the historic works that inspire them. The event will include a printing demonstration and a keepsake for attendees.

Also related to The Book Beautiful, mark your calendars for Private Press: William Morris | EarthlyParadise on June 27 at 6:00 p.m.. Learn more about the impact of foundational artist and thinker William Morris for a lecture by Victoria Hepburn, a Yale University instructor and researcher at the Yale Center for British Art. Victoria Hepburn is an expert on nineteenth-century British art and has written and taught widely on William Morris and the book arts.

Finally, the library commences its new Under the Arches Summer Music Series on June 30 at 6:00 p.m. with the Horszowski Trio. Gather on the library’s beautiful Great Lawn for an evening of music. The Horszowski Trio is an award-winning group that has traveled globally performing and promoting the great classical music of the Romantic age. This program will appeal to audiences of all ages.

Pequot Library also offers a number of ongoing monthly and weekly programs for children and adults, including a slew of children’s summer activities such as Dungeons & Dragons and Babes on a Blanket, and adult programs like the monthly Silent Book Club or Uncovering Shakespeare: From Folio to Fiction Book Group. Check their calendar for the complete schedule.

FAIRFIELD, CT — Pequot Library celebrates summer with an array of programs for children and teens, all of which are free and open to the public. On June 3 at 11:00 a.m., join Children’s Librarian Jane Manners and Plant Coco’s Garden. Come with a plant (herbs, basil, dill, cilantro, parsley or lettuce) and decorate its marker, then help prepare the soil to renew the eating garden for Coco, the library’s resident Reading Ambassador rabbit. This program is intended for children ages five-plus.

Teens entering grades 6 to 12 are invited for a Teen Advisory Board (TAB) meeting on June 7 at 4:00 p.m. TAB will meet monthly to help plan programs, give input on the Young Adult collection, and otherwise influence how the library serves teens. TAB members also assist with Pequot Library events and help with other library tasks as needed. On the same day, June 7 at 4:30 pm., experience a 30-minute, kid-friendly, interactive performance of As You Like It by the Apprentice Company of Shakespeare on the Sound. This program will appeal to ages 5 to 15.

Miss Susan’s Supper and Cookout returns on June 9 at 6:30 p.m. This community event serves as atribute to Children’s Librarian, Susan Ei. The Merwin Mountain Band will play live music. Attendees can play lawn games, make s’mores, and participate in the Great Pillow Fight, among other activities. They can also sign up for an official Summer Programs Attendee Card and start earning stamps by participating in events and activities. The summer program theme this year is Find Your Voice. In keeping with this theme, mark your calendars for Say Something Story Time on June 13 at 10:30 a.m; Show and Tell Storytime on June 20 at 10:30 a.m.; and Speak Up Storytime on June 27 at 10:30 a.m.

June 17 at 2:00 p.m. professional operatic soprano, Jamie Ratcliffe, leads an educational concertexperience for children. Learn about opera music, stories, and motifs as Ms. Ratcliffe explains andperforms selections from famous operas appropriate for all ages. Ratcliffe will be appearing this July as an emerging professional artist in the Vienna Summer Music Festival in Vienna.

Children ages six to ten: join the library for Make and Play Your Own Musical Instrument on June 21 at 4:00 p.m. In honor of Make Music Fairfield, children will use recycled materials to create and decorate simple musical instruments, and then bring them out to the Great Lawn to make a musical masterpiece. At 6:00 p.m. Pequot Library is excited to take part in said Make Music Fairfield, a free celebration open to anyone of any age, skill level and musical persuasion. Featured musicians include Brian Dolzani, Lackluster Brother, among others. Celebrate the summer solstice with your friends and family on the library’s Great Lawn. Please bring chairs, blankets, food and refreshments. For more information visit www.makemusicday.org.

Children in grades 3-5 can join the library on June 22 at 3:30 p.m. to make their own “book beautiful” in honor of the exhibition opening that evening, The Book Beautiful: Selections from the Private Press Movement. This zine-making workshop will teach how to plan, craft, and write your own zines that you can put out into the world for people to read.

The library commences its new Under the Arches Summer Music Series on June 30 at 6:00 p.m. with the Horszowski Trio. Gather on the library’s beautiful Great Lawn for an evening of music. The Horszowski Trio is an award-winning group that has traveled globally performing and promoting the great classical music of the Romantic age. This program will appeal to audiences of all ages.

Pequot Library also offers a number of ongoing monthly and weekly programs for children, including Dungeons & Dragons and Chess for Beginners. Looking forward, the library launches a new week-long summer program, Let’s Get Sewing!, from July 31 to August 4, as well as many programs related to the summer theme, Find Your Voice. Check the calendar on the library’s website for more information.

Pequot Library720 Pequot AvenueSouthport, CT 06890(203) 259-0346fax (203) 259-5602

August Programs Announced At Pequot Library In Southport

Programs for all ages run through Aug. 30.The following announcement is from Pequot Library:FAIRFIELD, CT — Pequot Library celebrates the last weeks of summer with programs for attendees of all ages. Students entering grades 6 to 12 are invited to join the library on August 2 at 4:00 p.m. for the Teen Advisory Board (TAB). TAB meets monthly to help plan programs, give input on the Young Adult collection, and influence how the library serves teens. TAB members might also assist with Pequot Library events and hel...

Programs for all ages run through Aug. 30.

The following announcement is from Pequot Library:

FAIRFIELD, CT — Pequot Library celebrates the last weeks of summer with programs for attendees of all ages. Students entering grades 6 to 12 are invited to join the library on August 2 at 4:00 p.m. for the Teen Advisory Board (TAB). TAB meets monthly to help plan programs, give input on the Young Adult collection, and influence how the library serves teens. TAB members might also assist with Pequot Library events and help with other library tasks as needed. Earn community service hours for attending meetings, staffing events, and helping around the library. Registration is required.

On August 3 at 10:00 a.m., the library hosts a meeting for prospective docents. Join staff members and current volunteers to learn more about the library’s school programs and tours for adults/families. Docents are trained to lead small groups of school-aged children and/or adults on walking tours of Pequot Library, historic Southport, and its rotating schedule of temporary on-site Special Collections exhibitions and installations. Docents engage visitors of all ages through interactive tours and often include a related hands-on learning experience. Since 2014, Pequot Library has welcomed nearly 6,000 K-12 school students for guided tours and programs. Docents are critical to the success of the library’s school programs. Please RSVP [email protected].

On August 19 at 10:00 a.m., enjoy a docent-led walking tour of historic Southport and step back in time to a bygone era. Learn about the harbor, onion fields, taverns, and the many families who once lived here. Experience Southport then and now. The tour costs $10/person, and registration is both limited and required.

Another Library Speakers Consortium digital talk will be held on August 30 at 2:00 p.m. with bestselling author Jeff Selingo. He immersed himself in the world of college admissions for a year to answer the question on the minds of teenagers and their parents: how do colleges select their freshman classes? His resulting book, Who Gets In and Why: A Year Inside College Admissions, was named one of the 100 Notable Books of 2020 by the New York Times.

Finally, Pequot Library offers a number of ongoing monthly and weekly programs for children,including Dungeons & Dragons and Babes on a Blanket. Adults will also discover affinity groups such as the Knitingales, a weekly knitting group, and monthly Genealogy Roundtable meetings. Check their calendar for the complete schedule.

ABOUT PEQUOT LIBRARY:Pequot Library’s annual programs for adults and children serve more than 45,000 participants ayear. As a public association library 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, the library relies on thegenerosity of donors at fundraisers, corporate and community partners, and Friends of PequotLibrary memberships. Follow Pequot Library on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

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Popular Southport fishing spot could soon be repaired and reopened

This is a carousel. Use Next and Previous buttons to navigateSOUTHPORT — The lower wharf in Southport is a picturesque, idyllic space where people can come to walk their dogs, sit on benches or go fishing."It's wonderful," said Marcia O'Connell, a Southport resident. "It's a no-brainer to have this for the community."But the wharf's retaining wall has missing and broken stones, and the cement cap on top of it is chipped and cracked. Meanwhile, the fishing pier is in a state of disrepair, with a ...

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SOUTHPORT — The lower wharf in Southport is a picturesque, idyllic space where people can come to walk their dogs, sit on benches or go fishing.

"It's wonderful," said Marcia O'Connell, a Southport resident. "It's a no-brainer to have this for the community."

But the wharf's retaining wall has missing and broken stones, and the cement cap on top of it is chipped and cracked. Meanwhile, the fishing pier is in a state of disrepair, with a sign hanging on it warning people to stay off.

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The town wants to repair the retaining wall and its top layer of cement, as well as replace the pilons of the fishing pier and rebuild its walkway so people could use the pier again. The state is expected to approve the plan soon, though the funding piece is still in question.

Those at the wharf on Tuesday were met with a gentle breeze, geese swimming in the water and the sound of wind chimes on a nearby resident's front porch. O'Connell said she brings her dog Tucker to the wharf as often as she can, adding it can be quiet during the week but gets a lot of visitors on Saturdays.

"At one time, one of the schools brought their little boys over here once a week or once a month to fish as a group," she said. "I think the community loves it for that kind of reason."

O'Connell said she hopes they repair and improve the wharf, noting she once saw a wedding there where the fishing pier was used, and called the spot a boon to the community.

"I think it's really special, and I would be disappointed, and so would Tucker, if we lost it," she said.

Plans to repair the wharf, which officials said has been needed for a long time but became even more necessary after a storm last December, have been stymied by roadblocks at various points in the process. Kim Taylor, the chair of Fairfield's Harbor Management Commission, said the town is expecting state approval of the plans in the coming weeks.

Taylor said the wharf had been beginning to look "kind of seedy" in recent years.

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"It's a wonderful space for taking a look at Long Island Sound and strolling the beautiful village of Southport," she said. "But, if you've been down there, you can see that the retaining wall around the edges has stones beginning to slip out. The concrete edging is beginning to crack. There's supposed to be two piers down there. One of them had to be dismantled several years ago because it was falling in."

Taylor noted the other fishing pier had to be closed because it was unsafe. She said the commission decided years ago it needed to be spruced up.

Taylor said there were plans in the work to dredge the harbor in that spot around the boat launch, and the town got a grant from the Connecticut Port Authority to do it. This way, she said, boats could be launched at lower tides than the mud there currently allows.

"For a whole lot of reasons... we were unable to proceed with the dredging," she said, later noting the town ran into problems finding a place to put the material that would have been dug up.

So, Taylor said, the commission decided to move to phase two of its plan — fixing up the wharf and its piers. She said they sent in those plans to the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection for approval in February.

Also in February, town bodies approved $800,000 to do the work, with officials noting at the time that Fairfield was applying for a $640,000 grant to cover part of that expense, but were unsure if it would come through. Taylor said the Connecticut Port Authority has not issued that type of grant so far this year.

"We're not sure when the (Small Harbor Improvement Projects Program) grant process will re-open," she said.

So now, Taylor said, the town is in a situation where the plan will be approved but the funding source is in question. She said the town will immediately apply if the port authority starts issuing grants again, adding she thinks Fairfield would get the money if that happens.

"Or, maybe there's a wonderful person in town who wants to have a fishing pier named after them," she said. "That remains to be seen."

Taylor said she can't see how the work could be done in the next year, noting it is a project that has to be done in the winter. She said the fishing pier will likely not be open this summer.

"We've done everything we can possibly do, and until we come up with $800,000, we can't even go to bid," she said.

Robert Bruder, a longtime Fairfield resident, said he has been visiting the wharf with his dog Kip for a few years. He said it means a lot for the community to have a place like the wharf.

"There aren't a lot of places like this on the water, with boats and wildlife, overlooking the sound," she said. "It's an important part of the local lore."

Bruder said he sees people there all the time with their dogs or sitting on the benches, adding he used to see people fishing off the pier as well. He said it is in "pretty bad shape" now, and he hopes it gets fixed up.

"It's an important little enclave of the area," he said. "People come not only from town but also from other towns. It's a nice sort of interaction with community people and people from outside of it, and the dogs bring everyone together. It's kind of a meditative, benevolent environment."

CJ Young, a Milford resident who was fishing off the wharf, said he goes down there for the beauty as well as the fishing.

"I haven't come here this year yet, but historically it's pretty good fishing," he said, adding he primarily catches striped bass and bluefish there.

Young said he has in-laws that live nearby, and he used to go to the fishing pier just to hang out with his fiance.

"This is always a good spot to come down, walk the dog and just look around," he said.

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